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Home > Christian Bible Studies > Articles > Church & Home Leadership

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A Footwasher to the Footwashers
The first shall be last, and the last, first.
Ken Barnes | posted 3/26/2013
 1 of 3



A Footwasher to the Footwashers

The mother of James and John, the sons of Zebedee, respectfully approached Jesus. She had a small request for Jesus. "Grant that one of these two sons of mine may sit at your right and the other at your left in your kingdom" (Matt. 20:21). It sounds like a typical Jewish mother's request ("My boys are good boys!"). She wasn't asking much, only that one could be the assistant Savior and the other the associate Lord. Jesus must have thought that he had heard it all now.

Jesus replied in a straightforward fashion, "You don't know what you are asking! Are you able to drink from the bitter cup of suffering I am about to drink?" James and John chime in, "We can" (v. 22). Their response proves they are pretty clueless.

The other ten disciples get wind that mama has been politicking for the "Sons of Thunder." The disciples start to make some noise of their own. "When the ten heard about this, they were indignant with the two brothers"—probably because they also wanted those positions (v. 24). Pride and vanity have a tendency to bring to the surface more pride and vanity. So we see the picture—all the disciples jockeying for position, working one-upmanship. They were a pretty ratty bunch.


Learn more through: Christian Leadership

The First Shall Be Last and the Last Shall Be First

Talk about a teachable moment. Jesus, the master teacher, was not going to miss this opportunity. But Jesus called them together and said, "You know that the rulers in this world lord it over their people, and officials flaunt their authority over those under them. But among you it will be different. Whoever wants to be a leader among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first among you must become your slave" (v. 25-27, NLT).

What a paradigm change! I wish I had been there to see the look on their faces. He had just described to them an upside-down leadership style. If you want to be a leader, become a servant; do what others are not willing to do. If you want to be first among the leaders, become a slave (a bond servant), not embraced with a legalistic obligation, but born of a free choice motivated by love. In this commitment there was no free agency; it was a lifetime of voluntary indentured service.

Remember, the Pharisees, the religious leadership of the day, modeled a different kind of leadership. They loved the best place in the synagogue. They loved to be noticed in the market place and for others to recognize them and say, "Hello, Rabbi." The disciples must have been tempted to think that when their movement succeeds, it would be nice to occupy the best seats and to be noticed by the people. But after this little discourse by Jesus, they might have been thinking, Maybe I should rethink this leadership thing.

Finally, Jesus reveals to them the hinge that would support this radical service. That hinge would be the willingness to give up their lives. "For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve others and to give his life as a ransom for many" (v. 28). At the core of all authentic service is a relinquishment. No, for most of us it will not be our physical lives, but in true service there is always the aspect of giving up what we want in order to do what he wants. How did this teaching go over with his disciples? Let's fast-forward to the end of Jesus' ministry on earth to answer this question.






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