Yesterday: How Muslims See Christianity | Many Muslims don't understand Christianity—especially the idea of salvation by grace through faith.

Tuesday: Islamic Fundamentals | Christians have a responsibility to understand our Muslim neighbors and their beliefs

Monday: Islam, U.S.A. | Are Christians prepared for Muslims in the mainstream?

God-fearing Muslims from every corner of the earth are moving into American neighborhoods. Are we ready to welcome them and tell them the truth about Jesus? This week at ChristianityToday.com, we take a look at the basics of Islam, how Muslims view Christianity, helpful models for relating to Muslims, and how to engage our Muslim neighbors boldly and lovingly.The South Asian Friendship Center is a bookstore in the heart of a Muslim business district in Chicago. (More than 400,000 Muslims live in Chicago.) The shelves are lined with books in Urdu (the language of Pakistan), Arabic, and English with author names like J. I. Packer and John Stott. The center makes no apologies for its overt Christian beliefs. SAFC, a multidenominational effort of many area churches, opened in September 1997 and carries out a fourfold vision.First, SAFC's bookstore is a legitimate business. A "mini-Borders" for Asians, it is a haven where people can read and relax on a couch or other chairs, nibbling on free cookies and sipping chai (Indian tea). SAFC sells Christian literature, books, videos, and cassettes at reasonable prices—and often gives these items away.Second, SAFC strives to serve the community by offering tutoring in English as a second language; after-school homework help; classes in Hindu and Urdu; help with immigration issues; legal counsel; home visitation; and medical help.The third aspect of SAFC's ...

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