Indonesian religious violence erupts again
It's another sad day in the Malukus. On Sunday a speedboat pulled up to the beach at Kulur village on the island of Saparua and the men aboard then shot and killed a 23-year-old woman and two 11-year-old girls.

The attackers remain unidentified, but Christians were blamed and a riot broke out in the regional capital, Ambon. A Muslim mob set upon a van full of Christians and set it ablaze. The driver, Dany Matulessy, was killed and two others were injured before police intervened.

The Jakarta Post says some are speculating that "the attack on Kulur village was part of an effort to renew the interreligious violence in Maluku" — which suggests the speedboat attackers may have been Muslims, not Christians.

Two suspects in Pakistan church attack killed in escape attempt
Mohammad Waseem and Mohammad Akram, both accused of attacking a Protestant church in Behawalpur last year, were in a police van to take authorities to where they said arms and ammunition were hidden. The van was ambushed by three men in a white car, and the prisoners were freed. The police chased them down, and killed two of the ambushers and the two prisoners. They continue to hunt for the third attacker.

This isn't an isolated case. Just six weeks ago, almost the same story happened with four other suspects in the church attack.

More fuel on the fire of Jewish evangelism Following a statement by the U.S. Roman Catholic bishops that Jews dwell in a saving covenant with God and thus should be excluded from evangelism, a group of Protestant and Catholic scholars say they agree—and that therefore Jesus isn't necessary for Jews's salvation. "Christians meet God's saving power in the person of Jesus Christ and believe that this ...

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