American missionary shot to death in Kenya
Missionary Paul A. Ritchey, of Hagerstown, Maryland, was shot to death by a group of gunmen who invaded and robbed his residence in the far western Kenya town of Malaba, on the Ugandan border.

There's quite a bit of discrepancies in various media reports (including the victim's name, variously and erroneously given as Richie, Ritcheri, and Ritch), but they agree that he was working with Outreach Baptist Church in the town and that he had been ministering on both sides of the border.

Teso District police officer William Okello described the attack to the Associated Press: "There were two local children watching television in the house where he was staying, and the intruders told them to lie down. When [Ritchey] came out of the bedroom, one of the men told him in Kiswahili to hand over his money. Apparently he didn't understand, and he told them to go away. Then he was shot."

John Otieno, pastor of Outreach Baptist, told The East African Standard that there were three invaders, armed with an AK-47 rifle, a panga (machete), and a knife, "The deceased was watching television when the gangsters forced everybody to lie down. The priest had earlier visited Uganda for prayers. The killers escaped to Uganda through the Malaba River," reports the Standard.

The Nairobi newspaper also includes this indecipherable but ominous addendum: "The murder occurred a week after security officers arrested seven suspects in connection with a spate of thuggery that had hit Teso District. … The operation which was led by Chief Inspector Crispus Mutalii of the Administration Police and Teso Deputy OCPD, Mr Ben Changulo, led to the arrest two pastors." Weblog can't find reference to the arrest of two pastors ...

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