Guest / Limited Access /

Exploring the increasing tendency toward spiritual longing in today's mainstream music, including Grammy-winning albums from Bruce Springsteen and Coldplay.


This feature isn't about "safe music." We're not vouching for the personal faith of the artists listed below, nor are we suggesting that they don't have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ.

What we are calling attention to is the increased interest in spiritual subject matter in today's popular music outside the Christian subculture. Despite the rise in explicit content within popular music in recent years, there has also been a rise in spiritual soul searching, with artists expressing a longing for something much deeper than the infamous sex, drugs, and rock & roll.

Skeptical? We would be too. But the artists listed here wouldn't be included if we were just highlighting what Christian listeners wanted to hear. Some of these artists do indeed come from a Christian background, offering glimpses of their faith through their craft. Others still don't know Christ, but they certainly know of him — enough to communicate spiritual longing with an honesty that is refreshing.

We present to you our first edition of "Glimpses of God," six of perhaps many current examples of spirituality found in today's mainstream music. Most songwriters will tell you they like to let listeners interpret songs for themselves rather than define their music for them. Decide for yourself from these examples, but we believe that if nothing else, you can use the music of these artists to, as one speaker once put it, "preach from a common pulpit."

Bruce Spingsteen
The Rising

(Columbia)
Classic rock

"There's spirits above and behind me, faces gone black, eyes' burnin' bright/May their precious ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Tags:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
TrendingFive Errors to Drop From Your Easter Sermon
Five Errors to Drop From Your Easter Sermon
If you want to help people see Holy Week with fresh eyes, start by dropping these familiar fallacies.
Editor's PickWatch and Wait
Watch and Wait
Tarrying with Christ and the fearful dying.
Leave a Comment

Use your Christianity Today login to leave a comment on this article. Not part of the community? Subscribe now, or register for a free account.

hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

January 2003

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.