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Christian theology takes seriously the reality of evil. How can we do otherwise, when the newspaper every day tells of war, poverty, sexual abuse, and other signs that evil is afoot in our world? Some groups (e.g., Christian Scientists) have claimed that evil is not real. Others (e.g., ancient Gnostics) have claimed that those who truly know Christ have already been transported out of the material world of suffering and evil. Historically the church has judged such teachings to be heretical.

Paul writes eloquently of "the sufferings of this present time" (Rom. 8:18): "We know that the whole creation has been groaning in labor pains until now; and not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly while we wait for adoption, the redemption of our bodies" (Rom. 8:22-23). As Jesus wept at the tomb of Lazarus, lamenting death's power over one he loved, so also Christians continue to groan under the power of evil, in solidarity with a fallen creation.

The question refers to the defeat of Satan (who, by the way, is not actually mentioned in Col. 2:15) on the Cross. Yet several New Testament texts speak of the Devil actively prowling about looking for someone to devour (1 Pet. 5:8) and call Christians to participate in the ongoing struggle against "the cosmic powers of this present darkness" (Eph. 6:12).

In light of all this, the real problem is how we are to understand Colossians 2:15, which seems to contradict so much of the New Testament witness, not to mention our own experience of evil in the world. A few sentences in Colossians seem to express a realized eschatology—that is, a belief that Christ's triumph over evil is already complete and that the coming kingdom of God is already ...

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hide thisFebruary February

In the Magazine

February 2004

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