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Early online punditry: Religious conservatives are in control of the country

George Bush has been given another four years in the White House, say both conservative and liberal activists, but the biggest winners today are probably religious conservatives. It's no mistake that his acceptance speech today included a promise to "uphold our deepest values of family and faith."

"The evidence points to the evangelicals as Bush's primary engine of victory," writes National Review's Larry Kudlow.

Religion poll guru John Green and Steve Waldman of Beliefnet do the math on the exit polls and agree: "In the pivotal states, he benefited from the strong support of evangelical Christians and, just as important, an impressive showing among regular churchgoing Catholics and mainline Protestants."

The Christian Coalition says "Christian evangelicals" are the group that put Bush over the top. The Family Research Council's Tony Perkins and former Bush opponent Gary Bauer prefer to focus on "values voters."

Concerned Women for America does a bit of dancing.

"Evangelicals voted in force in this year's election, securing the presidency for George W. Bush, granting parents in Florida the right to be notified before their minor daughter's abortion, and passing marriage protections laws in every state they were offered — even liberal Oregon," writes senior policy director Wendy Wright. "President Bush knows his strongest base, who they are and what drives them. Perhaps this is because, as many evangelicals and conservative Catholics can relate, he is one of us." (He's a conservative Catholic? No, as Green has earlier explained, "traditionalists" in both Protestant and Catholic camps have more in common with each other than they do with their ecclesiological ...

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Launched in 1999, Christianity Today’s Weblog was not just one of the first religion-oriented weblogs, but one of the first published by a media organization. (Hence its rather bland title.) Mostly compiled by then-online editor Ted Olsen, Weblog rounded up religion news and opinion pieces from publications around the world. As Christianity Today’s website grew, it launched other blogs. Olsen took on management responsibilities, and the Weblog feature as such was mothballed. But CT’s efforts to round up important news and opinion from around the web continues, especially on our Gleanings feature.
Ted Olsen
Ted Olsen is Christianity Today's managing editor for news and online journalism. He wrote the magazine's Weblog—a collection of news and opinion articles from mainstream news sources around the world—from 1999 to 2006. In 2004, the magazine launched Weblog in Print, which looks for unexpected connections and trends in articles appearing in the mainstream press. The column was later renamed "Tidings" and ran until 2007.
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