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The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe
Our Rating
3½ Stars - Good
Average Rating
 
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Mpaa Rating
PG (for battle sequences and frightening moments)
Directed By
Andrew Adamson
Run Time
2 hours 23 minutes
Cast
Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes, William Moseley, Anna Popplewell
Theatre Release
December 09, 2005 by Walt Disney Pictures and Walden Media

At last, the Pevensies have reached the silver screen. What a joy to see Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy—the four siblings of C. S. Lewis's beloved The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe—brought to life so vividly. After all of the rumors, the fretting about literary fidelity, and the angst about religious agendas, we can praise director Andrew Adamson and his fine young actors for developing these "Sons of Adam" and "Daughters of Eve" into three-dimensional, engaging characters.

There they stand, at a train stop in the middle of nowhere, luggage in hand, fidgety and nervous. Their mother has sent them away from bomb-blasted London due to the Nazi threat, and they're on their way to a safer place in the country. Wasn't someone from the mansion of Professor Kirke supposed to meet them here and take them away to their new wartime refuge?

But they're no more nervous than Lewis's countless fans who worried about a faithful adaptation. Could Adamson pull it off? Would the film measure up to the hype and expectations? Are these Pevensies like the children of the book? And above all—did they get Aslan right?

Lucy (Georgie Henley) and Peter (William Moseley) at the London train station

Lucy (Georgie Henley) and Peter (William Moseley) at the London train station

Back at the train stop, watching the road for any sign of help, young Edmund frowns, checks his I.D. tag, and says, "Perhaps we've been incorrectly labeled."

Indeed. Many mainstream journalists have treated the movie as a sort of pending terrorist attack, but this movie cannot be dismissed, like so many preachy "Christian films," as religious propaganda. And the anxious faithful can relax, as Adamson has done no serious injury to the narrative's basic outline of sacrifice and redemption. "The lion's share" of Lewis's meaningful story remains intact.

Adamson, who also directed the Shrek films, was never much interested ...

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The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe
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