Guest / Limited Access /

The Sudanese government and the main rebel group, the Sudan People's Liberation Army/Movement, pledged November 19 to stop a decades-old civil war by the end of 2004.

All 15 envoys on the United Nations Security Council signed the agreement as witnesses at the meeting in Nairobi, including Ambassador John Danforth of the United States. Danforth, the council's president for November, initiated the first Security Council meeting outside New York in 14 years.

The council promised political support and economic aid, including "possible" debt relief, but left the amount unspecified. Sudanese officials have said it could take $1.8 billion to implement the peace accords. Negotiations took three years.

"It's up to you to prove the naysayers and skeptics wrong," Danforth, who has worked as a special envoy to end the Sudanese civil war, told the warring sides. "The violence and atrocities being perpetuated must end."

The 21-year war in the south, pitting the Muslim-dominated government in Khartoum against mostly Christian and animist rebels in the south, has claimed some 2 million lives.

It has also prompted the formation of a strong international religious lobby, including liberal and evangelical Protestants, Roman Catholics, Muslims, and Jews pressing the international community on the issue.

The separate conflict in the country's Darfur region also received attention. That conflict, which began in February 2003, pits non-Arab Muslim groups against the government and Arab militias. It has left 1.8 million people displaced and around 70,000 dead.

The United Nations called the Darfur conflict the world's worst humanitarian crisis. The U.S. Congress and some human- rights and aid groups have labeled the violence genocide.

On Darfur, the council ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Read These NextSee Our Latest
Also in this Issue
Subscriber Access Only The Fraudbuster
The faithful are being defrauded of billions. But this Ponzi-busting ex-con knows how to stop it.
RecommendedThe CT Interview: Saeed Abedini Answers Abuse Allegations
Subscriber Access Only The CT Interview: Saeed Abedini Answers Abuse Allegations
The formerly jailed Iranian American pastor talks to CT about his marriage, his imprisonment, and his hopes for revival.
TrendingChristians Can Hold Their Bladders and Still Shop at Target
Christians Can Hold Their Bladders and Still Shop at Target
Consider the missional implications before you boycott.
Editor's PickWhat Jen Hatmaker Gets Right about Christian Love
What Jen Hatmaker Gets Right about Christian Love
Reactions to her message to LGBT people highlight how confused we are about love and repentance.
Christianity Today
Giving Hope a Chance
hide thisJanuary January

In the Magazine

January 2005

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.