Crash
Our Rating
2½ Stars - Fair
Average Rating
 
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Mpaa Rating
R (for language, sexual content, and some violence)
Directed By
N/A
Run Time
1 hour
Cast
Dennis Hopper, Moran Atias, Ross McCall, Jocko Sims
Theatre Release
October 17, 2008 by Lions Gate Films

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day is a classic children's story about a day in which everything that can go wrong does go wrong for a young disgruntled kid. Paul Haggis's first film Crash is similar, only it's about the whole city of Los Angeles having a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. Alexander's mishaps came in all shapes and sizes, but the stressed-out L.A.-dwellers of Crash are suffering various manifestations of the same disease—racial prejudice. Discrimination seems to have conquered the city in an epidemic, the way the "Rage" virus turned Londoners into zombies in 28 Days Later. And unlike Alexander's story, Crash doesn't wrap things up in a tidy, happy ending. While each of the characters' hate-filled confrontations is plausible, a two-hour barrage of them leaves us weary and groping for something more meaningful and hopeful than this film has to offer.

Haggis, who adapted the similarly bleak Million Dollar Baby from the stories of F.X. Toole, has a flair for dark tales of human weakness. The screenplay he wrote for Clint Eastwood's Oscar-winner was powerful because it focused on three characters intently, drawing us deeply into their relationships. Crash, by contrast, has enough characters to fill a phone book. As in Grand Canyon, Short Cuts, Magnolia, and Thirteen Stories About One Thing, myriad wheels of narrative are turning all at once, interlocking in surprising ways. We're as dazzled by Haggis's plot-juggling act as we are by the intensity of his lament for a world that seems broken beyond fixing.

Jennifer Esposito, Don Cheadle and Kathleen York

Jennifer Esposito, Don Cheadle and Kathleen York

Perhaps the most effective quality of Crash is its scope. We all recognize certain familiar varieties of discrimination—government oppression, hate crimes, unflattering ...

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