Dear Dr. Accad,

I rarely respond to comments critical of my writing. But your heartfelt essay, "Evangelical Blindness on Lebanon," spoke very deeply to me. I don't know you personally, but you are my brother in Christ. And your people are suffering. So I want to respond, and to do so publicly, in the hope of contributing to the edification of Christ's body and the healing of our suffering world.

I hear the desperation and misery in your voice. I sense your fear for the well-being of your loved ones and your grief over those already torn to pieces by Israeli bombs. I hear your rage at the nation that is inflicting this suffering on your people, and at Hezbollah for starting this latest round of fighting, and at the feckless international community, and at global evangelicals, especially in the United States, and at the U.S. government itself.

I, personally, am struggling deeply right now to have any hope about many of the same things that you are struggling with. I think the United States government has been pursuing a disastrous foreign policy since September 11 and that now we are reaping some of the consequences of that mixture of unilateralism, militarism, Wilsonian idealism, and negligent incompetence. My sympathy for Israel—which is indeed deep, a mix of all kinds of factors, some rational, some emotional—does not extend to support for what has clearly become a massive and disproportionate military offensive. And when I read about Hezbollah, and Hamas, and Syria, and Iran, and the growing sophistication of the weapons being fired at Israel, and the emergent pro-Iran Iraq, and the tangled web of ties and dark plans that connect Israel's enemies, I sense a coming conflagration.

My reference to Ahmadinejad's apocalyptic ...

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We Risk Not Just Suffering, But Annihilation
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