I didn't grow up on Amy Grant and Michael W. Smith. Quite the opposite. Early one Saturday morning during high school, my father decided to wake me with Jethro Tull's Thick as a Brick blasting on my stereo. I now know every word to that 45-minute song.

So I was perplexed when friends at my Christian college, knowing my musical tastes, would introduce me to "cool" Christian bands struggling to make it in the mainstream music industry or to break out of the Christian biz. These groups would say, "We're Christians, but we're not a Christian band."

It's an established trend. Entertainment executive and author Mark Joseph says that the concept of Christian music is "in the middle of a quiet collapse" as a younger generation realizes that to be taken seriously outside the Christian scene, a band must stay far, far away from that scene. This conceptual collapse is breeding not only confusion, but also litigation.

A perfect example is the lawsuit recently filed by the band Mute Math against its Christian label, Word, and the label's owner, Warner Brothers Records. Some Mute Math members were formerly in Earthsuit, an "unabashedly Christian act," according to Billboard. Mute Math has sold most of its albums in the Christian market and played Christian festivals. Band members maintain they are all Christians. Yet they say they expected Warner to release the album, not Word.

So they sued, complaining that the Word release damaged their brand. Keyboardist and cofounder Paul Meany tells Billboard, "I had no desire to be the Christian version of a real band." Meany complains, "They [Word] were going to market it the exact way we didn't want."

In other words, Word was going to market this band made up of Christians to Christians. The suit, ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

May
Subscribe to CT and get one year free.
Read These Next
Also in this Issue
Dribbling Circles Around Jesus Subscriber Access Only
What did Jesus mean when he said that we would do greater things than he did?—Tyler Willian, Los Angeles, California
Current IssueThe Science of Sinning Less
The Science of Sinning Less Subscriber Access Only
What new research reveals about self-control and willpower.
Current IssueBearing Burdens After Obamacare
Bearing Burdens After Obamacare Subscriber Access Only
The future of Christian health care sharing.
RecommendedIs It Robbing God to Tithe on Your After-Tax (Not Gross) Income?
Is It Robbing God to Tithe on Your After-Tax (Not Gross) Income?
The Israelites were never subject to withholding upward of 15 percent.
TrendingForgiveness: Muslims Moved as Coptic Christians Do the Unimaginable
Forgiveness: Muslims Moved as Coptic Christians Do the Unimaginable
Amid ISIS attacks, faithful response inspires Egyptian society.
Editor's PickThe March for Science Is Willing to Get Political. But Will It Welcome Religion?
The March for Science Is Willing to Get Political. But Will It Welcome Religion?
How evangelical scientists square their place in the global movement.
Christianity Today
Rock Un-Solid
hide thisJune June

In the Magazine

June 2006

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.