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"I couldn't thank U in ten thousand years/If I had cried ten thousand rivers of tears/Ah, but U know the soul and U know what makes it gold/U who give life through blood"—from "Something Beautiful"

While it may not be as initially shocking as, say, Bob Dylan's brief foray into making gospel albums, some are still going to be surprised to learn that Sinead O'Connor is following suit with her album Theology.

This is, after all, the same woman who infamously tore up the picture of the Pope on Saturday Night Live, was excommunicated after her being "ordained" as a Catholic priest, and at one time, announced she was a lesbian (she recanted shortly after). And if that wasn't enough to solidify her "rebel" status, she once refused to have "The Star Spangled Banner" played before her show, and has been sporting a shaved head long before Britney made the news after she buzzed her locks.

After a self-imposed sabbatical from the pop scene—she didn't pick up a guitar or even sing for several years—the mother of four insisted on getting her priorities back in order. As she tried to figure out her place in both life and music, she wrote a prayer to God asking to sort things out. O'Connor ended up titling it "Something Beautiful," and it became the first song on Theology, a double-disc project that features the same songs twice—one disc with stripped down acoustic arrangements recorded in Dublin, the other more produced pop recorded in London. In addition to original songs, the album also includes covers of Curtis Mayfield's "We the People Who Are Darker Than Blue" and "I Don't Know How to Love Him" from the musical Jesus Christ Superstar.

Based on the book of Jeremiah, O'Connor says "Something Beautiful" was very ...

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