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2½ Stars - Fair
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Mpaa Rating
PG (for some sensuality and language)
Directed By
Scott Hicks
Run Time
1 hour 44 minutes
Cast
Catherine Zeta-Jones, Aaron Eckhart, Abigail Breslin, Patricia Clarkson
Theatre Release
July 27, 2007 by Warner Bros.

Kate Armstrong (Catherine Zeta-Jones) is the head chef at upscale NYC restaurant 22 Bleecker, where she's known for her type-A temperament and her killer saffron sauce. For a woman whose professional work is marked by such flair and spice, her personal life is pretty dull. She dresses in all black, rises at 4:30 each morning to buy fresh fish at the docks, and returns to her empty apartment each evening, where her answering machine offers the daily announcement that she had no new messages. Kate's work is her life, and both are governed by a strict set of rules—no music in the kitchen, no dating men in her building, etc.

This carefully constructed order is interrupted when Kate's sister is killed in a car crash, leaving her nine-year-old daughter, Zoe (Abigail Breslin), to come live with Aunt Kate. The two females have no idea what to do with each other. They make tentative attempts to relate: Zoe moves her menagerie of stuffed animals into Kate's spare bedroom, and Kate offers delicacies of fish and duck to her bewildered new charge. Both women are grieving and lost.

When Kate returns to work, she finds Nick Palmer (Aaron Eckhart) minding her kitchen in her absence. He's all toothy smiles and goofy charm to her pinched precision, and he threatens her sense of order and control. While Nick and Kate are like oil and water, Nick and Zoe are like chocolate and peanut butter. They become fast friends as he proves to be the glue to help mend this broken little girl and to help bring these two strong-willed women closer together.

If you've seen any romantic comedies, you can probably already see what unfolds in the rest of the movie—the budding relationships, the requisite complications, the happy resolutions. Though ...

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