Today's Top Five

1. Anti-Christian terrorism strikes again in the Philippines
In Friday's Weblog, I wondered why the five-year anniversary of the botched rescue of American missionaries Martin and Gracia Burnham has elicited several major media pieces. After all, the Burnhams' story made national news only a few times while it was going on, and the main development in the Philippines is that several of their captors have been killed. (For Charles Colson fans: Monday's BreakPoint broadcast responded to the Burnham-focused New Republic article.)

Well, this weekend sadly brought a new news hook, as Muslim kidnappers abducted Italian priest Giancarlo Bossi Sunday as he was on his way to celebrate Mass. While police say that a splinter group of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front was behind the kidnapping, the MILF says it was Abu Sayyaf, the group that kidnapped the Burnhams.

2. Church of England says it may sue over video game's 'virtual desecration' The Playstation 3 game Resistance: Fall of Man, which has been out in the U.S. since November but only since late March in the European Union, takes place in an alternate 1950s Britain. An alien race has conquered Europe and is laying siege. It has an elaborate alternate history — but uses several buildings recognizable in the real 1951 world. It's the game's use of one of these buildings, Manchester Cathedral, that has the Church of England furious. "The video footage of the Cathedral battle on 'YouTube' has shocked and dismayed us beyond words and can only be described as virtual desecration," Dean of Manchester Rogers Govender wrote to Sony officials. "We are shocked to see a place of worship, prayer, learning and heritage being presented to the youth of today as a location ...

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Weblog
Launched in 1999, Christianity Today’s Weblog was not just one of the first religion-oriented weblogs, but one of the first published by a media organization. (Hence its rather bland title.) Mostly compiled by then-online editor Ted Olsen, Weblog rounded up religion news and opinion pieces from publications around the world. As Christianity Today’s website grew, it launched other blogs. Olsen took on management responsibilities, and the Weblog feature as such was mothballed. But CT’s efforts to round up important news and opinion from around the web continues, especially on our Gleanings feature.
Ted Olsen
Ted Olsen is Christianity Today's managing editor for news and online journalism. He wrote the magazine's Weblog—a collection of news and opinion articles from mainstream news sources around the world—from 1999 to 2006. In 2004, the magazine launched Weblog in Print, which looks for unexpected connections and trends in articles appearing in the mainstream press. The column was later renamed "Tidings" and ran until 2007.
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