Guest / Limited Access /

God had performed miracles for Scott and Donna Lehrer before they began looking for a farm to buy. When their marriage was in crisis, each one had decided, separately, to attend church. They became Christians the same Sunday morning at different congregations.

Over the next couple of years, as their marriage grew stronger, they decided to homeschool their children. Scott faced a difficult work environment as an executive, so they looked to move out of the suburbs. But Scott was skeptical when his wife said that she felt God wanted the family to raise sheep. "Excuse me," Scott replied. "I can't even stand to mow my own yard. What makes you think I'm going to start doing things like that?"

The family took a Sunday drive through Big Rock, Illinois, just a few miles west of their Aurora home in Chicago's sprawling suburbs. They began attending church in Big Rock and let it be known that they were looking to buy a farm.

Soon their pastor put the Lehrers in touch with a family that needed to sell a small plot of land. It was perfect for suburbanites who had never farmed before. It seemed like a miraculous start. Scott continued to commute to work in the suburbs, while the couple began experimenting on their ten acres.

Today, Lamb of God farm supplies about 40 families every week of the summer with fresh fruits and vegetables, and sells produce at farmers' markets around Chicago. Wool from their sheep is sold at a nearby knitting store, owned by their daughter.

During a CT editor's visit, Scott bends and grabs a handful of compost. "Smell that," he says, lifting to his nose a mixture of sheep manure and hay. "That'll make some good fertilizer."

It would take a miracle to get him to suit up again for a corporate boardroom, Scott says. ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Support Christian thought journalism. Donate to our nonprofit ministry today.
From Issue:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
Also in this Issue
Subscriber Access Only Lovers in a Dangerous Time
Over the Rhine is sensual, spiritual, and political.
RecommendedThe Key to Raising Kind Kids
The Key to Raising Kind Kids
Harvard psychologist Richard Weissbourd says it’s closer than you think.
TrendingRussia’s Plan to Ban Jehovah’s Witnesses Puts Evangelicals in a Tight Spot
Russia’s Plan to Ban Jehovah’s Witnesses Puts Evangelicals in a Tight Spot
Group gives Protestants competition for souls, but also an ally on religious freedom.
Editor's PickThere’s No Crying on Social Media!
There’s No Crying on Social Media!
Young adults are desperate not to let peers see any signs of weakness or failure.
Christianity Today
The Good Shepherds
hide thisOctober October

In the Magazine

October 2007

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.