Editor's note: Just one week after we posted the following story, writers voted to end their strike and return to work.

Everyone in Hollywood is ready for the Writer's Guild of America (WGA) to end its lengthy, debilitating strike. The strike has brought the film and television industry to a standstill, cost thousands of jobs and over $1 billion in total economic productivity, and angered fans across the world now deprived of their favorite television shows.

But beyond the obvious, headline-grabbing impacts, there is an even greater, more crippling effect on the average person in L.A. Many people (and not just the 12,000 striking writers) are suffering financially, emotionally, even spiritually from the effects of the strike, and Hollywood Christians are responding with care and prayer.

Earlier this month, Kim Dorr, Associate Pastor for Entertainment Ministries at Bel Air Presbyterian Church, joined up with an interdenominational coalition of Los Angeles-based Christian entertainment professionals to sponsor weekly prayer and fellowship gatherings as long as the strike is going on. Dorr, who also runs the Defining Artists talent agency in Universal City, recalls that in the early days of the strike she sunk into a "sky is falling" state of panic as wide swaths of the industry were laid off and the town appeared to be shutting down. But then Dorr realized that "for such a time as this, I was ordained to minister to these people."

Thus, along with writer/showrunner John Tinker (Judging Amy, The Practice), writer John Wierick (The Matthew Shepherd Story), writer Barbara Nicolosi, and Karen Covell (founder of Hollywood Prayer Network), Dorr made plans to create a "safe spot where the two sides could come together without demonizing ...

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Christians Unite for Strike's End
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