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Editor's note: If you are following the now-labeled "Summer of Schism" among global Anglicans, the well-known George Conger, occasional correspondent for Christianity Today, offers the assessment below after his exclusive interview in the U.K. with Archbishop and Primate Gregory Venables from Argentina, and Pittsburgh Bishop Robert Duncan.

These are two of the most prominent evangelical Anglicans worldwide. Venables preached the closing sermon at the recent Global Anglican Future conference in Jerusalem, and now, both Venables and Duncan are in attendance at Lambeth, the once-every-10 years gathering in Canterbury on the campus of the University of Kent.
After this report, I've included a press release from GAFCON primates, released in the last 48 hours. This is a direct response to the criticism from Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams regarding the GAFCON statement.
The bottom line is this: The Anglican crisis continues to escalate and will do so well toward the end of 2008. This fall, several American dioceses will vote on whether to separate from the Episcopal Church. On Wednesday, a west suburban Chicago-area priest confided: "It's all over but the lawsuits." She may just be right.
By George Conger in Canterbury

The crackup of the Anglican Communion is at hand, evangelical bishops attending the Lambeth Conference in Canterbury tell Christianity Today, and to them, the 400-year-old Anglican project appears over.

"I'd like to expect a miracle," said Bishop Venables, a leader of the evangelical alliance at Lambeth, but said he feared the prospects for the church holding together were grim.

"Humanely speaking, there is little hope for even a peaceful separation" between the liberal and evangelical wings of the 80-million-member ...

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