Guest / Limited Access /

On upcoming broadcasts of the Hour of Power from the glistening Crystal Cathedral in Southern California, the face that will appear in the pulpit won't always be that of Robert A. Schuller, the son of founder Robert H. Schuller.

The elder Schuller, 82, announced Sunday (Oct. 26) that differences between them about the future of the ministry have led to a decision to expand the platform of the broadcast.

"It is no secret to any of you that my son, Robert, and I have been struggling as we each have different ideas as to the direction and the vision for this ministry as we move into the future," the elder Schuller wrote in an announcement made at a church meeting Saturday and posted on its website the next day.

He added that the disagreement was placing the ministry in "jeopardy" and that the two men would "part ways in the Hour of Power television ministry to each pursue our own unique God-ordained visions."

Church spokesman John Charles said the decision about the younger Schuller, 54, was a board decision.

"He's still senior pastor of Crystal Cathedral, the local congregation," Charles said of the younger Schuller. "He's just no longer the single pastor on the Hour of Power."

Charles said the younger Schuller had differed with the board, chaired by his father, about whether there should be more faces in the Hour of Power pulpit.

Already, that is changing, with Walt Kallestad, pastor of Community Church of Joy in Glendale, Ariz., preaching Sunday.

The elder Schuller said he hopes other ministers who, like, Kallestad, have taken part in his ministry's Institute for Successful Church Leadership, will be guest ministers. Other possibilities included Bill Hybels, senior pastor of Willow Creek Community Church near Chicago, and Kirbyjon ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Read These NextSee Our Latest
RecommendedHow Do I Talk with Someone Whose Worldview Opposes My Own?
How Do I Talk with Someone Whose Worldview Opposes My Own?
This week on Thursday is for Thinkers, Dr. Toby Jennings explores the biblical ways to talk with someone with an opposing worldview.
TrendingFive Errors to Drop From Your Easter Sermon
Five Errors to Drop From Your Easter Sermon
If you want to help people see Holy Week with fresh eyes, start by dropping these familiar fallacies.
Editor's PickHow God Became Jesus—and How I Came to Faith in Him
How God Became Jesus—and How I Came to Faith in Him
Bart Ehrman’s narrative suggests the more educated you are, the less likely you are to believe. My life proves otherwise.
Leave a Comment

Use your Christianity Today login to leave a comment on this article. Not part of the community? Subscribe now, or register for a free account.

hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

October 2008

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.