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The Lolita Effect: The Media Sexualization of Young Girls and What We Can Do About It
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Book Title
The Lolita Effect: The Media Sexualization of Young Girls and What We Can Do About It
Author
Publisher
The Overlook Press
Release Date
May 1, 2008
Pages
286
Price
$24.95
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This spring, Disney pop star Miley Cyrus became the center of a media backlash when Vanity Fair released photos of the Hannah Montana lead in nothing more than a sheet. While the magazine is known for pushing boundaries of propriety, these images were particularly troubling due to the age of the star (15) and those who emulate her (girls as young as 8). The images illuminated the way children younger and younger are becoming players in a sexual culture traditionally reserved for adults.

How did children come to be seen as sexually available as adults? M. Gigi Durham contends in The Lolita Effect: The Media Sexualization of Young Girls and What We Can Do About It (4 stars) that the sexualization of children, especially young girls, is largely perpetuated by print and electronic media. Durham's title evokes Vladimir Nabokov's 1955 Lolita, a modern classic about a French scholar who falls in love with a 12-year-old. What does the Lolita Effect look like today? "Adult sexual motifs are overlapping with childhood—specifically girlhood, shaping an environment in which young girls are increasingly seen as valid participants in a public culture of sex." Durham, a University of Iowa communications professor, argues that the Lolita Effect harbors a special interest in those less discerning about sexual boundaries.

Durham offers an arsenal of statistics and examples to demonstrate that drawing young girls into sexual culture is, in part, a backlash against feminism. As adult women gain more influence in the public square, girls—naïve and easily manipulated—become a more appealing image of female sexuality for a media culture that has enshrined "sex sells" as its motto.

Durham explains that the Lolita Effect thrives ...

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