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Copenhagen: Control or Climate Change?

Since President Obama appeared in Copenhagen, where world leaders discussed climate change, some are praying that he would make policy changes, while some are hoping that he would not.

"We who join in prayer today believe the time has come, Lord," Tim Costello of World Vision Australia and Brian McLaren wrote in a prayer later posted on Sojourner's God's Politics blog. "Please guide us now, our God, at this critical moment in history, to better fulfill our role as stewards of this fragile planet. Guide the leaders of nations who gather in Copenhagen."

This past week Costello continued, praying that when President Obama arrives Copenhagen "his ability to reach across political chasms, bridging cultures from Kenya to Kansas, will nudge the process enough, building the case for a [sic] unprecedented action as a global community even in these final hours."

Other groups do not share his hopeful view of the Copenhagen conference.

For Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, the conference is not about climate change but population control.

"For years, the green team has used photos of cuddly polar bears and harp seals to cover up their real agenda of radical environmentalism: population control," Perkins said. "This week, that message is front and center at the Denmark summit, as 'climate cultists' try to force a global limit on procreation."

Wendy Wright, president of Concerned Women for America, called on Obama to oppose China's population control policies. "No proposal is more despicable and, if followed, would constitute a violation of basic human rights than the suggestion that governments should emulate China's coercive family planning program," Wright wrote in an open letterto ...

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December 2009

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