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The Limits of Control
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3 Stars - Good
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Mpaa Rating
R (for graphic nudity and some language)
Genre
Directed By
Jim Jarmusch
Run Time
1 hour 56 minutes
Cast
Isaach De Bankolé, Alex Descas, Jean-François Stévenin, Óscar Jaenada
Theatre Release
September 19, 2009 by Focus Features

The Limits of Control is a film about subjective meaning. Its title comes from a William S. Burroughs essay ("The Limits of Control") about how language is used as a control mechanism. "No control machine so far devised can operate without words," writes Burroughs, "and any control machine which attempts to do so relying entirely on external force or entirely on physical control of the mind will soon encounter the limits of control." It's not entirely clear exactly how this idea fits into writer/director Jim Jarmusch's film. There are a number of ways you could look at it. And for better or maybe worse, that is exactly the point.

Jarmusch is an arthouse director. Throughout his career, his films—whether Down by Law or Dead Man, Ghost Dog or Broken Flowers—have been less about understanding "meaning" than appreciating "moments," which has resulted in a resume full of eccentric cult classics, oddball gems, and maddeningly esoteric art experiments. The Limits of Control follows strongly in this tradition: it's a resoundingly subjective, trippy experience, not recommended for the hardcore objectivists of the world (or even the moderate objectivists).

The film opens with an appropriately cryptic quote from Arthur Rimbaud: "As I descended impassable rivers / I no longer felt guided by the ferrymen." Importantly, the quote is first given to us in French, and then English. Language, translation, and the fluid meaning of words is a motif that pops up again and again in this film. Fans of Derrida will resonate.

The "plot" follows "Lone Man" (Isaach De Bankolé), a well-dressed, methodical man on a mysterious mission in a foreign land (Spain) to do something that is by all appearances criminal in nature. But we never ...

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