A nature to nurture, an instinct to sin / What's underneath the skin you live in? / Betrayed you're an image … Oh precious creation / You will submit, you will give in.
(from "Suddenly")

The not-a-Christian-rock-band Creed was huge in the late 1990s and early 2000s, eventually selling 26 million albums in the U.S. The band's first three studio releases, My Own Prison (1997), Human Clay (1999), and Weathered (2001), spawned such hits as "One," "Higher," "With Arms Wide Open," and "My Sacrifice."

Creed began as a crew of college-age friends making music together, and rose from independent band to full-blown arena rock band after signing with Wind-up Records. Opinions about Creed tend to run hot and cold, with little room for lukewarm. Some called them derivative, and others lambasted frontman Scott Stapp's onstage "Jesus" poses. Rolling Stone called Creed a "ham-handed version of early Pearl Jam."

Love them or hate them, the band reached stratospheric heights. Stapp confirmed the worst successful-yet-tortured-artist stereotypes, however, when he came crashing down in an alcohol-fueled rampage, dragging the multi-platinum-selling band with him. No doubt Stapp's drinking contributed to the band's break-up in 2004, although he says otherwise. "I was moving in one direction musically, and as a guitar player, Mark [Tremonti] wanted to move in another direction," he told Christian Music Today in which he expressed his Christian faith. "That was essentially the reason we broke up."

After the split, Stapp went solo, releasing The Great Divide in 2005, a "flop" that sold fewer than 400,000 copies. The previous year, he'd contributed a track to an album inspired by Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ.

"The [film] basically inspired ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

May
Subscribe to CT and get one year free.
Tags:
Read These Next
Current IssueEven in Canada, Conservative Churches Are Growing
Even in Canada, Conservative Churches Are Growing Subscriber Access Only
Mainline churches with evangelical leanings outpace their liberal counterparts, study says.
Current Issue5 Books More Christian High Schoolers Should Read
5 Books More Christian High Schoolers Should Read Subscriber Access Only
Matthew Farrelly recommends some overlooked classics.
TrendingThe Theology Beneath the Trump-Comey Conflict
The Theology Beneath the Trump-Comey Conflict
How the former FBI director’s interest in Reinhold Niebuhr shaped his approach to political power.
Editor's PickWe Actually Don’t Need a Trinitarian Revival
We Actually Don’t Need a Trinitarian Revival
Attempts to teach a ‘better’ understanding of the Trinity may do more harm than good.
Christianity Today
Full Circle
hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

November 2009

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.