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James Dobson may have retired from Focus on the Family, but the psychologist has kept a full schedule this week. Earlier this week, he began his new radio program called Family Talk, he switched his endorsement from Trey Grayson to Rand Paul for U.S. Senate, and he appeared at a National Day of Prayer event in Washington on Wednesday. Dobson spoke with Christianity Today about the National Day of Prayer and his future involvement in politics.

Since your wife is chairman of the National Day of Prayer, would you like to weigh in on the judge's ruling that the day is unconstitutional?

There's a cloud over the country. The National Day of Prayer put a prayer covering over the nation, and there are millions of people who pray for this country, our military, our families, and our government. Since 1775, when the first Continental Congress called for a national day of prayer, there have been such events called for by almost every President. I saw the figures—34 out of 44 Presidents have called for a national day of prayer. Some of those who didn't have died in office. William Harrison caught pneumonia at his inauguration and was never able to call for a national day of prayer; he died a month later. The vast majority have called for a national day of prayer, starting with George Washington; Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War; Franklin Delano Roosevelt during World War II; Woodrow Wilson during World War I; George Herbert Walker Bush during Desert Storm; George W. Bush twice during his term of service. In fact, George Bush held events at the White House every year for eight years for the National Day of Prayer. My wife was one of the speakers at that event for eight years. This has been our history. This is our tradition; ...

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Q & A: James Dobson on the National Day of Prayer
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May 2010

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