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FaithWords is poised to release Philip Yancey's What Good is God? on October 19, bolstering the launch with an array of national advertising, online promotion, and social media interviews.

However, the U.S. publicity push lags behind Yancey's first related appearance—a book signing at Livraria Cultura in downtown São Paulo on September 6, the day the title released in Brazil. Ten days later, Hodder & Stoughton released the book in the United Kingdom.

Mark Carpenter, CEO of Brazilian publisher Editora Mundo Cristão, calls this "an important signpost."

"It indicates the growing importance of Christian publishing outside the U.S., particularly in emerging-market economies," said Carpenter, former chairman of Media Associates International, which supports Christian publishing worldwide.

"We're often running to catch up with American release dates," said Ian Metcalfe, publisher of Bibles and digital at Hodder & Stoughton. However, he added, "I don't think it's a big deal. There are still different markets around the world."

With 15 million in English-language sales alone for Yancey's 20-plus books, the significance of debuting his latest outside the English-speaking world isn't lost on the 60-year-old author. He sees growth in titles from other nations as well.

"Christianity is a global concern now, and publishers in Korea, Brazil, and other large markets got tired of just reprinting American books," Yancey said. "They work at cultivating their own writers."

The first printings of Yancey's latest show that America's influence still dominates Christian publishing. Brazil and UK publishers ...

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October 2010

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