Guest / Limited Access /
Violence in Nigeria: Breaking the Country's Fatal Deadlock
Image: Photo by Dele Jones / AP / Corbis
Violence in Nigeria: Breaking the Country's Fatal Deadlock

When a suicide bomber drove an explosives-packed car into the flagship church of one of Nigeria's largest denominations, angry Christian youth retaliated by burning Muslim shops and killing nearby motorcycle riders.

The February incident, which killed 12 and injured 40 at the Church of Christ in Nigeria's Jos headquarters, fueled the global debate over whether Nigeria will erupt into a religious civil war. Christmas Day bombings of northern churches by Islamist extremists, which killed 44, also fueled such fears. The headlines haven't stopped since. On Sunday, gunmen attacked church services in Kano and in Maiduguri, killing at least 21 people, including a pastor preparing for Communion.

Missing from all the analysis and commentary on the ethnic, political, and economic causes of such violence was one crucial element: theology.

Decades of violence have tested the faith of Nigerian Christians, but have also warped their theology. Too many of them now believe that violence is more redemptive than nonviolence; in other words, they resort to human efforts—traditional retaliation—when seeking justice. Correcting this warped theology offers the best way forward. Violence is a moral problem that challenges the core of the nature, presence, and power of the gospel in any environment.

Nigeria began the 21st century with the February 2000 slaughter of thousands in Kaduna over the introduction of Shari'ah law, and September 2001 saw a spree of church and mosque burnings in Jos. In November 2008, disputed local elections triggered clashes between Muslim and Christian youth in Jos. Hundreds died. In April 2011, riots following the controversial election of Christian president Goodluck Jonathan killed an estimated ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

From Issue:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
Also in this Issue
Interview: Why Sarah Macintosh Ran Away from CCM and Went Back
She left Christian music a decade ago, frustrated with the industry. Now she's back on a CCM label. Here's why.
Current IssueDaily Devotion: How Christians Rank 16 Mundane Essentials of Faith
Subscriber Access Only
Daily Devotion: How Christians Rank 16 Mundane Essentials of Faith
A graphical look at Pew's research on the lives of highly religious Americans.
RecommendedThe World’s Biggest Muslim Organization Wants to Protect Christians
The World’s Biggest Muslim Organization Wants to Protect Christians
Another major gathering of Islamic leaders denounces extremism.
TrendingNicole Cliffe: How God Messed Up My Happy Atheist Life
Nicole Cliffe: How God Messed Up My Happy Atheist Life
I had no untapped, unanswered yearnings. All was well in the state of Denmark. And then it wasn’t.
Editor's PickWhy I'm Not a Conscientious Objector
Why I'm Not a Conscientious Objector
I can't condemn war in the way my Anabaptist friends so quickly do.
Christianity Today
Violence in Nigeria: Breaking the Country's Fatal Deadlock
hide thisApril April

In the Magazine

April 2012

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.