Guest / Limited Access /

When considering Christian faith and practice, we are used to asking, "Is it true?," but we also need to ask the question, "Is it beautiful?"

The ancient Greek philosophers, and later the early church fathers, spoke of three prime virtues: truth, goodness, and beauty. As prime virtues, truth, goodness, and beauty need no further justification—they are their own justification, which is a way of saying that truth, goodness, and beauty don't need to be made practical—they don't have to doanything to be of value. The value of a virtue is inherent; we simply choose truth, goodness, and beauty because they are true, good, and beautiful.

Early Christian theologians located the source of these prime virtues as proceeding from God himself—truth, goodness, and beauty are virtues because God is true, good, and beautiful. Thus this trinity of virtues becomes a guide to Christian living as we seek to believe what is true, be what is good, and behold what is beautiful.

But it is this third virtue, the virtue of beauty, that has been most marginalized in the way we understand and evaluate Christianity. As a result, Christianity has suffered a loss of beauty—a loss that needs to be recovered. With an emphasis on truth, we have tried to make Christianity persuasive (as we should). But we also need a corresponding emphasis on beauty to make Christianity attractive. Christianity should not only persuade with truth, but it should also attract with beauty. Along with Christian apologetics, we need Christian aesthetics. Christianity needs … to be presented as beautiful. Often where truth cannot convince, beauty can entice.

The aesthetic aspect of Christian witness and doctrine ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Support Christian thought journalism. Donate to our nonprofit ministry today.
From Issue:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
Also in this IssueA Rueful Meditation
Subscriber Access Only A Rueful Meditation
Leonard Cohen sings of mortality and hope.
RecommendedDo All Children Go to Heaven?
Subscriber Access Only Do All Children Go to Heaven?
Reconciling original sin and death of the innocent.
TrendingWhy Do We Have Christmas Trees?
Why Do We Have Christmas Trees?
The history behind evergreens, ornaments, and holiday gift giving.
Editor's PickA Journey as Old as Humanity Itself
A Journey as Old as Humanity Itself
What’s behind our timeless fascination with religious pilgrimage?
%%var.bookTitle%%
Christianity Today
Beauty Will Save The World
hide thisFebruary February

In the Magazine

February 2012

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.