Exodus International's Alan Chambers Accused of Antinomian Theology
Image: Photo by Alan Marler / AP
Exodus International's Alan Chambers Accused of Antinomian Theology

Exodus International president Alan Chambers has, in the past week, explained the Orlando-based ministry's recent U-turn on reparative therapy to everyone from The New York Times to NPR to MSNBC's Hardball.

And while the organization's stance remains acceptable to most evangelicals, some scholars fear that Chambers's theological convictions—sprinkled throughout those interviews—have not.

"It's not that he is simply not saying the warnings [against homosexual activity] in Scripture. I could live with that," Pittsburgh Theological Seminary professor Robert Gagnon said of Chambers's recent comments. "It's that he is saying the exact opposite of what Scripture clearly teaches … . He's preaching an anti-gospel."

The theological heresy in question is antinomianism. The term was coined by Martin Luther to refer to those who believe that since faith is sufficient for salvation, Christians are not obligated to keep God's moral law.

Gagnon, author of The Bible and Homosexual Practice and a plenary speaker at Exodus's 2009 Freedom Conference, said that a June interview in The Atlantic shows that Chambers's views have veered. "Some of us choose very different lives than others," Chambers said of gay Christians in same-sex marriages. "But whatever we choose, it doesn't remove our relationship with God."

When asked to clarify whether or not that meant "a person living a gay lifestyle won't go to hell, as long as he or she accepts Jesus Christ as personal savior," he replied, "My personal belief is … while behavior matters, those things don't interrupt someone's relationship with Christ." ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

May
Subscribe to CT and get one year free.
Read These Next
Current IssueEven in Canada, Conservative Churches Are Growing
Even in Canada, Conservative Churches Are Growing Subscriber Access Only
Mainline churches with evangelical leanings outpace their liberal counterparts, study says.
RecommendedWho’s In Charge of the Christian Blogosphere?
Who’s In Charge of the Christian Blogosphere?
The age of the Internet has birthed a crisis of authority, especially for women.
TrendingThe Theology Beneath the Trump-Comey Conflict
The Theology Beneath the Trump-Comey Conflict
How the former FBI director’s interest in Reinhold Niebuhr shaped his approach to political power.
Editor's PickSix Ways Men Can Support Women's Discipleship
Six Ways Men Can Support Women's Discipleship
Male clergy and laity who want to enable women's ministry often don't know how to get involved or what to do.
Christianity Today
Exodus International's Alan Chambers Accused of ...
hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

July 2012

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.