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Finally, the study found that Hispanics generally hold a high view of the Bible as the inspired, inerrant Word of God—but they may regard it as a sacred text, rather than as a practical tool with implications for work and social attitudes, Kinnaman said. Only 8 percent are "engaged" with the Bible—which Barna defines as having a high view of the Bible's authority and reading it at least four times a week.

In other words, Kinnaman said, Hispanics need to be persuaded that the Bible holds value for how they should live their lives.

Javier Elizondo, managing editor of Cristianismo Hoy (a CT spinoff launching in 2013) says this means Hispanic ministry leaders must "find ways to help our church members and youth to connect in a more meaningful way to the Scriptures, particularly in the way the Bible can be used to inform decision making."

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