Guest / Limited Access /
Page 2 of 2

Finally, the study found that Hispanics generally hold a high view of the Bible as the inspired, inerrant Word of God—but they may regard it as a sacred text, rather than as a practical tool with implications for work and social attitudes, Kinnaman said. Only 8 percent are "engaged" with the Bible—which Barna defines as having a high view of the Bible's authority and reading it at least four times a week.

In other words, Kinnaman said, Hispanics need to be persuaded that the Bible holds value for how they should live their lives.

Javier Elizondo, managing editor of Cristianismo Hoy (a CT spinoff launching in 2013) says this means Hispanic ministry leaders must "find ways to help our church members and youth to connect in a more meaningful way to the Scriptures, particularly in the way the Bible can be used to inform decision making."

Support our work. Subscribe to CT and get one year free.
Read These NextSee Our Latest
Current IssueThe Value of Friends Who Don’t Look, Think, or Vote Like You Do
Subscriber Access Only
The Value of Friends Who Don’t Look, Think, or Vote Like You Do
When you limit your social circles, you limit your opportunities to grow.
RecommendedHere's Why 800 Christians Left Their Old Churches, and How They Chose New Ones
Here's Why 800 Christians Left Their Old Churches, and How They Chose New Ones
Pew examines church shopping among evangelicals (and other groups) in 2016.
TrendingOld Hollywood’s Abortion Secret
Old Hollywood’s Abortion Secret
What a culture of death tells us about a culture of life.
Editor's PickWhy the Whole Church Needs Psalm 137, Violent Imagery and All
Why the Whole Church Needs Psalm 137, Violent Imagery and All
A protest song for Syrian refugees and suburban soccer moms.
View this article in Reader Mode
Christianity Today
New Efforts by Barna Group, NAE, Others Aim to Reach—and ...