Guest / Limited Access /
Reviews

/

Page 4 of 4

Matchar is sympathetic, even admiring, of much of what's involved in New Domesticity, but balks at its solipsistic tendencies. "Let's not retreat to our homes, the way the women of the original nineteenth-century Cult of Domesticity did," she concludes. "Let's invite the world inside." While I'd argue that that "inviting the world inside" was in fact precisely what women like Harriet Beecher Stowe and Sarah Josepha Hale were trying to do, much of Matchar's analysis of this cultural phenomenon is intelligent and insightful—essential reading for anyone who has ever felt inadequate or guilty for not DIYing it all.

And now I'll get back to knitting a sweater. I'm not going to blog about it, or post it for sale on Etsy. It's for another friend's baby. And I don't think I'm changing the world with each stitch. Sometimes a handcraft is just a handcraft.

Rachel Stone is the author of Eat With Joy: Redeeming God's Gift of Food (InterVarsity Press). She blogs at rachelmariestone.com.

Browse All Book Reviews By:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
Recommended
Subscriber Access Only Until We Meet Again
'Does the Bible teach that we will recognize our loved ones in heaven?'
TrendingThe 10 Most Influential Churches of the Last Century
The 10 Most Influential Churches of the Last Century
There is much to learn from some key trends in the last 100 years of church history.
Editor's PickWhy Black Churches Are Keeping Millennials
Why Black Churches Are Keeping Millennials
The reasons are rooted in history.
Comments
View this article in Reader Mode
Christianity Today
Not 'That' Kind of Housework