Guest / Limited Access /
Notes from Newtown
Image: Dan Callister / Rex Features / AP
Notes from Newtown

After the horrendous news pummeled Newtown, Connecticut, then the world, that gray December morning, it took only a couple hours for Walnut Hill Community Church to get to work.

With a mission to "ignite a passion for Jesus in New England," the nondenominational church of 3,500 deployed pastors to the families, some of whom are members, then set up a prayer service and filled its chapel with area counselors. Some 900 residents descended on the church the week before Christmas to remember slain 6-year-old Dylan Hockley as a pipe band played "Amazing Grace" from the parking lot. Then it set up a fund to provide long-term care to the community of 28,000 reeling from the murders of 20 children and 6 staff members.

From far beyond Connecticut's borders, chaplains arrived to support first responders, the families of victims, and residents. While some Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod (LCMS) leaders were wringing their hands after a Newtown pastor took part in an interfaith vigil, the denomination sent comfort dogs as a ministry of presence. "Just heard about the goldens you sent to Connecticut," wrote one Newtowner on a Lutheran website. "I'm an agnostic, but reading about [work] like this makes me doubt my own beliefs, or lack thereof." (LCMS president Matthew C. Harrison later apologized for the debacle, honoring the Newtown pastor as "a source of constant affirmation that God is indeed here in Newtown.")

God in Newtown? Local painter Bryn Gillette, a Christian who's now donating all proceeds from his artwork, agreed: "Since Friday it has felt like this 'open heaven'—the veil permanently rent—and rather than darkness flooding in, it ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

From Issue:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
RecommendedNancy Writebol: Ebola Is a Spiritual Battle
Subscriber Access Only Nancy Writebol: Ebola Is a Spiritual Battle
The missionary nurse who survived the deadly virus says medicine alone won't cure West Africa.
TrendingMark Driscoll Resigns from Mars Hill
Mark Driscoll Resigns from Mars Hill
"I do not want to be the source of anything that might detract from our church’s mission."
Editor's PickMy Immigration Status: Beloved
My Immigration Status: Beloved
In Christ I am more than the ‘crime’ I committed at age 5.
Comments
Christianity Today
Notes from Newtown
hide thisApril April

In the Magazine

April 2013

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.