Christians lose landmark human rights ruling

UNITED KINGDOM When human rights collide, which trump which? In a much-anticipated ruling, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) decided that equality and safety laws trump religious conscience (most of the time). In January, it ruled that the United Kingdom did not unjustly discriminate against three out of four Christians who were fired because of their religious beliefs. The ECHR ruled in favor of Nadia Eweida (above), a Coptic Christian fired from British Airways for wearing a cross at work. But in the other three cases—a hospital chaplain also dismissed for wearing a cross (but, in this case, deemed a safety hazard), and a counselor and a registrar who refused to serve same-sex clients—the court said no European human rights laws were violated.

Government revises definition of nonprofit religious employer

In February, the government proposed two changes to its employer contraceptive mandate. The changes largely removed controversial language that narrowly defined religious organizations. However, the revised exemption still does not apply to for-profit companies that object to contraception coverage on religious grounds, or to nonprofits that aren't explicitly religious. "We're doubtful that anyone who wasn't already covered by the exemption will be covered by it," said Kyle Duncan, general counsel for the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, which represents many of the organizations suing the government. Overall, for-profit businesses seeking an injunction against the mandate had a 10-4 winning court record by early February.

Prominent pastor supports gay relationships

UNITED KINGDOM A well-known British evangelical has publicly ...

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