Before Surprise Resignation, Regent's Campo Saw Writing on the Wall

During his three years as president of Regent University, Carlos Campo never walked away from controversy. He spoke out frequently about immigration reform, the lack of civil dialogue between Christians and the LGBT community, and his passion for "color-blind" higher education.

In his first interview since suddenly leaving Pat Robertson's school—its second president to depart mere weeks into the school year—Campo spoke this week with Tim Morgan, senior editor for global journalism. (CT also offers an extensive profile of Campo's rise from valet parker to university president and Latino evangelical leader within 10 years.)

Nobody seemed to see your resignation coming. It was a thunderclap for lots of folks. Did you see it coming?

I did see it coming. But when it occurred, it did come as a surprise. Regent has been an institution with a pretty volatile past in some ways. You know, folks come and go rather rapidly. And there were five previous presidents other than Dr. Robertson to me, and many of them left rather suddenly. So I knew it was likely to happen with me.

But it's not so unusual at a founder-led institution for there to be rapid change like this. And I think that's to be anticipated. I think people that know Regent well, if you were to go on campus and talk to folks, they would say they were not so surprised.

People are searching for clues. They are saying, "It was the 'Mission Congo' film." Or your advocacy for immigration reform. Can you shed any light on that?

Both university and myself have agreed to be pretty quiet. I did state that it was not the result of some sort of moral or fiscal crisis. When we talked about the timing of my leaving, ...

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