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After a while, people say: "Can this really be Allah's will? Can this really be his ideal for mankind? If this is Islam, I don't want any part of it."

In Afghanistan, one man who had been an imam said, "We were killing everybody in this village because they were a different branch of Islam than us. I took this little girl, one-and-a-half years old, in my arms. We had already killed her parents. She held my finger, looked me in the eye, as I stuck a knife into her and killed her. That was the beginning of my conversion."

The violence and killing is just outrageous.

Put your researcher hat on for a minute. Experts believe 84,000 Muslims are added to the world every 24 hours. How significant is it that there's this relative handful of Muslims coming to Christ?

This is extremely significant because it's unprecedented historically. But you've got to remember that with 1.6 billion Muslims in the world, this is statistically insignificant. It will only be significant if you happen to have caught the beginning of a change, a tectonic change in Islam around the world. That we can't predict. Hopefully, if we don't do something to screw it up, we might be able to see this wave expand.

How could these movements be nurtured?

I've got four desired outcomes for this book. The first is to capture this moment in history. The second is to encourage these Muslims who are considering Christ or who have come to faith in Christ, but think they're the only ones in the world. God has them on his front burner. He's reaching out to them.

The third one is to do a similar thing for Christians: This is not a time to hate, kill, and fear Muslims. This is a time to love, win, and reach Muslims. The fourth desired outcome is that we would learn the ways that God is at work, and that means in some cases humbling ourselves and saying we don't have all the answers.

In North America (what Muslims call Dar al-Harb, the House of War), where Muslims are getting the most witness, we're seeing the fewest conversions. But in the house of Islam, we're seeing movements breaking out in multiple places. We need to learn how to ride the wave of what God is doing and not find ourselves at cross purposes with it.

We've been hearing reports about Muslim dreams of Jesus for many years. Should those be accepted at face value?

It's part of the reality of their world. Mohammad listened to dreams, and he gave Muslims the impression that God could speak through them. So they do listen to them, and they do talk about them.

An awful lot of them are having dreams of a living being glowing with bright light and drawing persons to him or just exuding love or offering them a book to read. We can't conclude that they're getting the gospel. What we can conclude is that they're under conviction, which the Holy Spirit said they would be.

Kevin Greeson, author of The Camel: How Muslims Are Coming to Christ, heard Muslims talking about this dream. He would open up to Matthew 17 and just hand it to them and say, "Would you read these first two verses?"

He wouldn't read it to them. They would start reading. "After six days Jesus took with him Peter, James and John the brother of James, and led them up a high mountain by themselves. There he was transfigured before them. His face shone like the sun, and his clothes became as white as the light" (Matt. 17:1-2 NIV).

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