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This is the approach proposed in Desire, which ends with each of its subjects narrating their return to the communion of the Catholic church. It’s a powerful thing to hear Rilene talk of her first steps back into church (“Bless me father for I have sinned. It has been 35 years since my last confession . . . ”) and the flood of grace she feels upon returning. “I'm safe. I'm home,” says Rilene as the music swells and Malick-esque imagery fills the screen to close the film.

Though Kidnapped, Sing and Desire differ in their approaches to the question of what to do if you’re Christian with SSA, I think they would all agree that healing and restoration—whatever it looks like—happens best in communal rather than solitary contexts. And it is precisely in church communities that these films ought to be shown and these stories heard.

Brett McCracken is a Los Angeles-based writer and journalist, and author of the books Hipster Christianity: When Church and Cool Collide (Baker, 2010) and Gray Matters: Navigating the Space Between Legalism and Liberty (Baker, 2013). You can follow him @brettmccracken.

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