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Dane DeHaan and Aubrey Plaza in 'Life After Beth'Image: Greg Smith

Dane DeHaan and Aubrey Plaza in 'Life After Beth'

The events should have unfolded to give at least some answers, or lessons, or really just anything more than the little one-liners like “We’re ALL suffering” and “You can’t be both dead and alive.”

But everything jerkingly unravels into plot bunny trails, jokes that don’t stick, limbs that go flying, and new zombie facts that don’t get explained (“Let them stay in the attic - they like attics”). The gags (some literal, some not) keep it kinda fun to watch, but Life After Beth is too little to satisfy the appetite of zombie flick fans, and much too messy to amount to something more.

Caveat Spectator

The usual zombie elements: staggering bodies, blood, explosions, some language, etc. A character gets hit by a car and is seen struggling under the wheel for a minute. Two characters have sex (clothes don’t really come off). Sexual harassment is mentioned but not seen. An almost-zombie nameless extra shows up completely naked just to nudge the film towards the R rating it may not have had before. A mother feeds her zombie daughter her own hand (but you don’t see it). Limbs come flying off a zombie strapped to a large kitchen appliance tumbling down a mountain.

Taylor Lindsay is a writer in New York City. She contributes regularly to Indiewire.

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