Guest / Limited Access /
Thou Desirest Truth in the Inmost Parts
Image: HBO
Scott Glenn, Margaret Qualley, and Justin Theroux in 'The Leftovers'

Note: This is the seventh of ten commentary recaps on the first season of the HBO post-Rapture show The Leftovers. (The six previous are filed away here.)

As with all TV recaps, there are some mild spoilers below for those who did not watch the episode. If you’re only looking for a content advisory, I’ll tell you: this HBO show, were it a movie, would be rated R for language, violence, sexual content, and thematic material, but it changes from week to week. The first commentary carried a Caveat Spectator, so you can check that out. Note that there’s also nudity in a sexual context in this episode.

“I think I might be going crazy,” Kevin Garvey, Jr. tells Nora Durst.

Like my dad, we can hear him thinking. Like men in a story from an older time, Kevin Jr. bears his father’s name, lives in his father’s house, and has tried to fill his father’s shoes, becoming Mapleton’s police chief after Kevin Sr. set the library on fire and then voluntarily checked himself into psychiatric care.

Now, though, he’s worried there’s more than a vocational match between him and his father; his mental chemistry seems at stake, too. In this seventh episode, somewhat ironically titled “Solace for Tired Feet,” Jill and Kevin Sr.—who’s escaped from the institution to deliver his son a message—discover that Kevin is maintaining a “f—king pharmacy” in his bedroom, all kinds of drugs. “He’s under a lot of pressure, I guess,” Jill reasons.

Well, maybe. There are tranquilizers in the mix. But while Kevin has been questioning his sanity since day 1 of the show, the writers keep bringing him back from the brink. Things ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Watch This Way
How we watch matters at least as much as what we watch. TV and movies are more than entertainment: they teach us how to live and how to love one another, for better or worse. And they both mirror and shape our culture.
Alissa Wilkinson
Alissa Wilkinson is Christianity Today's chief film critic and assistant professor of English and humanities at The King's College in New York City. She lives in Brooklyn.
Previous Watch This Way Columns:
Support Christian thought journalism. Donate to our nonprofit ministry today.
Read These NextSee Our Latest
Current Issue
Subscriber Access Only Gleanings: April 2017
Important developments in the church and the world (as they appeared in our April issue).
Recommended'This Is Us' Captures the Drama of Unfolding Redemption
'This Is Us' Captures the Drama of Unfolding Redemption
Even in its most tear-jerking moments, the runaway NBC hit affirms our eternal hope.
TrendingRussia’s Plan to Ban Jehovah’s Witnesses Puts Evangelicals in a Tight Spot
Russia’s Plan to Ban Jehovah’s Witnesses Puts Evangelicals in a Tight Spot
Group gives Protestants competition for souls, but also an ally on religious freedom.
Editor's PickThe Three Myths of Cohabitation
The Three Myths of Cohabitation
Sociologist Bradford Wilcox reports the surprising results of his new international study on cohabitation and its impact on kids.
Christianity Today
Thou Desirest Truth in the Inmost Parts
hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

August 2014

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.