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UKRAINE: Orthodox priests pray for peace during a January standoff in Kiev between stone-throwing protesters and riot police. In the capital's Independence Square, evangelical pastors handed out 100,000 copies of the Gospel of John. Younger evangelicals largely supported the pro–European Union protests, while older evangelicals largely urged submission to pro-Russia authorities, said Sergey Rakhuba, head of U.S.-based Russian Ministries. "Yet in a time of turmoil, people are more open to the gospel."

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March 2014

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