Guest / Limited Access /

Can a film set entirely in a car, with just one actor driving and talking to a handful of unseen characters on speakerphone, make for a compelling hour and a half at the movies? Thanks to a star-making performance by Tom Hardy (The Dark Knight Rises), Locke powerfully answers in the affirmative.

Written and directed by Steven Knight (Redemption), Locke joins the ranks of a growing genre of what might be called "minimalist actor showcase" films, which leverage a fairly simple concept (almost always a survival story) to explore a solitary character in depth. Think Castaway with Tom Hanks (2000), Buried with Ryan Reynolds (2010), 127 Hours with James Franco (2010) and last year's Gravity (Sandra Bullock) and All is Lost (Robert Redford).

Like the latter film, which stars Redford as a seaman trying to survive alone after his yacht starts sinking, Locke is about one man doing his best to control a personal crisis, in this case while driving a car rather than steering a boat. Set in the U.K., Locke follows Ivan Locke (Hardy, sporting a Welsh accent) on one night of driving as he leaves a construction job near Birmingham and drives to London for a reason that becomes clear as the film progresses. Unfolding in what feels close to real time, the film's plot gradually reveals itself through Locke's phone conversations with various family members, friends, and coworkers, each representing an aspect of the man's life that is at or near a tipping point, high stakes all around.

With the exception of the opening and closing shots, the entire action of the film takes place in the confined interior space of Locke's car, which functions as a sort of "command center" for a man desperately seeking ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Tags:
Browse All Movie Reviews By:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
Current IssueGleanings: December 2016
Subscriber Access Only Gleanings: December 2016
Important developments in the church and the world (as they appeared in our December issue).
TrendingWhy Do We Have Christmas Trees?
Why Do We Have Christmas Trees?
The history behind evergreens, ornaments, and holiday gift giving.
Editor's PickWhen Christmas Meets the ‘Umbrage Industry’
When Christmas Meets the ‘Umbrage Industry’
If history is any guide, there’s no escaping the hostilities that erupt every December.
Christianity Today
Locke
hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

May 2014

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.