The Long Tail: ‘Last Days in Vietnam’ and ‘Rocks in My Pockets’

Two documentaries that take an imaginative look at difficult issues: Vietnam and depression.
The Long Tail: ‘Last Days in Vietnam’ and ‘Rocks in My Pockets’
'Rocks in my Pockets'

Alissa’s note: Ken Morefield, a long-time contributor to Christianity Today Movies and a cinephile and critic for whom I have great respect, writes a monthly post we’re calling “The Long Tail.” Each month, he looks at a few films that are being primarily distributed to American audiences through DVDs or Internet streaming and tries to surface some movies that might otherwise fly under the radar. Look for a new column every first Tuesday of the month!

As with most years, there’s a front-runner for the Best Documentary Feature at the Oscars—Laura Poitras’s Citizenfour. But I won’t be surprised if we hear Rory Kennedy’s name after “. . . and the Oscar goes to . . . ” The nominations hint that the Academy may still be a tad more comfortable with strongly political films that embed their ideological arguments into an historical narrative. (And the more remote that history, the better.)

Kennedy’s film Last Days in Vietnam, which is now available to stream on Amazon and other platforms, is fairly conventional. It deftly mixes archival footage, talking heads reciting stories, and some sparse but effective special effects to help contextualize the images and memories that form the bulk of the story. If voters are already tired of the red-state/blue-state reductionism in the dialogue surrounding American Sniper and Selma, Last Day’s conventionality may turn out to be an asset. It certainly won’t hurt that Kennedy is popular on the documentary festival circuit, where those of us who love the genre are well aware of her work promoting the films of others. (Among other titles, she is listed as a producer for Liz Garbus’s feature Bobby Fischer ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Watch This Way
How we watch matters at least as much as what we watch. TV and movies are more than entertainment: they teach us how to live and how to love one another, for better or worse. And they both mirror and shape our culture.
Alissa Wilkinson
Alissa Wilkinson is Christianity Today's chief film critic and assistant professor of English and humanities at The King's College in New York City. She lives in Brooklyn.
Previous Watch This Way Columns:
December
Subscribe to CT and get one year free.
Christianity Today
The Long Tail: ‘Last Days in Vietnam’ and ‘Rocks in My Pockets’
hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

February 2015

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.