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Many Christians talk about voting for president as a “commander-in-chief and not a pastor-in-chief.” What do you think of that statement?

I think that’s a good statement. We don’t elect a president to spiritually oversee the affairs of a nation. We do elect a commander-in-chief to set a respectable standard for our nation and to be the kind of man or woman that we would respect when they speak. That we would know their character and their desire lines up with their faith, whatever their faith would be.

I appreciate the idea that we don’t want to elect a pastor-in-chief. I’m a pastor and I understand that it’s my assignment to spiritually oversee the affairs of a circle of people. That’s not the job of a president. They are much more what I would see as a Daniel or Nehemiah. They are much more concerned about the affairs of our country.

But boy, we have to call upon them. We pay a high price as a people if we don’t hold our leaders to a high standard.

Richard Clark is the managing editor of Christianity Today Online. You can follow him on Twitter.

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