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The word Jesus stuck in my throat like an elephant tusk; no matter how hard I choked, I couldn't hack it out. Those who professed the name commanded my pity and wrath. As a university professor, I tired of students who seemed to believe that "knowing ...

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Michael Snow

February 18, 2014  11:30pm

I forget the author but there is a classic title, Obedience, the Key to Spiritual Knowledge

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Rechelle Fleck

February 02, 2014  6:39am

Rosaria - your article brought tears to my eyes. Not for the reason you would think, but because I remember how Christ redeemed me from the lesbian lifestyle. Like you, I fought Him on an intellectual level with everything that was within me. I had a great life with the perfect job, loving partner, Black Lab, and Volvo in the driveway. However, my mother prayed for my soul daily. My redemption came a little differently than yours as I had an accident that nearly killed me, but when I was finally able to see my life through the eyes of Christ, I was completely broken. I cried out to my Savior with everything I had as I realized how bankrupt I was without Him. All that I fought for in the GLBT community melted away as the love of my Messiah poured into my life in the dark agony of that hospital room. The change in life and heart was immediate. I wept for the gay community and my love for them turned into a Godly love. I now have a husband and 2 wonderful girls and CHRIST.

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Barbara Turner

October 10, 2013  10:57am

God bless on becoming a Christian. I was born and raised in a Christian home and baptized at the prodigal age of 8 knowing that's how I wanted to live my life. God is awesome! I used to attend a Methodist church near where I live and there was a couple who were both gay and converted to Christianity and met each other and married. Male and female in the glory of God. Amen. One of my cousins a female was born and raised an Episcopalian, grew up, got conventionally married, had 2 boys, went through a nasty divorce, went off on her own for a while, met her now "wife" and I still love her and pray for them both but I do not approve of their "union." The crazy part is this: my Uncle, my cousin's father, married them! He is now a retired Episcopal Rector of his own church. I questioned him when all this took place about 20 years ago and he said he sought Divine guidance and got it but I still don't approve! God bless and keep, love, me.

CJ Caufield

September 04, 2013  1:30pm

This is an inspiring story of redemption through the life of one redeemed pastor who genuinely loved his neighbor. One question ... this does seem convey that homosexuality is a choice and that there a came a point when she had decided to become heterosexual in her orientation after encountering Christ in a meaningful way. Is this an accurate reading of this story?

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Christine Cavitt

July 27, 2013  1:33pm

I left academe years ago, confused and in need of finding God all over again (only to discover that while I had wandered, He hadn't gone anywhere). It is extremely encouraging to hear from someone who found God in the midst of the chaos. As long as academics maintain the ideals of courage, honesty, and truth, there is hope. Bless you on your journey.

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jim achmoody

April 08, 2013  9:40am

What a powerful testimony/story which is so much better than any debate or argument. A changed life is the best advertizement for the power of faith. I hope she keeps writing as she has such a gift. So glad I heard her on the radio on 'understanding the times' yesterday.

Christine Jones

March 28, 2013  7:03pm

My comment is to Kimberly Knight who describes herself as "a lesbian who also had a radical transformation because of faith in Jesus." I went to your blog on patheos and learned that your "radical transformation" is of a different variety than our subject author's-- as you state there that you are currently in a committed lesbian relationship. i think it was a little bit misleading of you to imply that your "transformation" was in any way similar to Rosaria's when it bears so little resemblance to hers. I, for one, was disappointed when I saw the truth on your blog. I have lots of close gay and lesbian friends. I also know a few who have renounced that life and are living and walking a straight life with Jesus. You implied you were someone like the latter group. I'm curious about why you chose to describe yourself in that way here and in a different way over at patheos.

Lee Hall

March 27, 2013  2:17pm

Thank you for your beautiful testimony.

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Moses Jesudass

March 19, 2013  5:17pm

It is a wonderful testimony. I wish many would be able to have access to this article. This article is a the evidence that the power of God's word is so true and it will never lose its power on those who read with sincere heart. It does't matter whether someone believes in the inspiration of the Bible or not. The fact remains that the Bible has power to change those who read it with sincere heart to repent. Transformed lives are proof that the Bible is the Word of God. Another subject that was discussed in this week's issue is that California Moves To Pass First State Ban of Gay Conversion Therapy. Who cares? Of course some professional therapists are running away from practice. Rosaria Champagne Butterfield's testimony is a convincing and powerful evidence of the power of the Holy Spirit's working in and through humble servants of God who are not condemning but always seeking those who are lost. Thank God for everyone who are involved in this poweful and beautiful story.

Dayton Perkins

March 18, 2013  10:00pm

I opted out in favor of maintaining a relationship with God in 1976. Yes there are many of us. I should just add that deciding against Jesus Christ is a fatal error. Don't believe it? Fine: but keep your honesty and you will change your mind.

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Eric Griego

March 10, 2013  5:57pm

John, how very awesome! Congrats on the recovery of your god given sexuality, and on the incredible insight you gained.

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John Warren

March 07, 2013  5:06pm

...Angry at his question after 27 years of turmoil, I said if I could choose, I would want to be straight. That was almost 22 years ago. I have been married for 19 years, have an amazing wife and 3 wonderful children. It wasn't an overnight fix. The first 2 yrs were really tough as I had to relearn who I was. It was only through falling in love with Jesus, being in a church who embraced me for who I was and having close friends walk with me, that I was able to make it. I have had the privilege over the many years to see others walk out of homosexuality. What am I now 100% convinced of? 1)No-one is born gay. 2)Almost down to every person, is an unhealthy father relationship. 3)It is a choice. One of the natural loves God has given us is a same sex love. For young guys, especially when they go through puberty, when they naturally begin to desire that same sex love, they confuse the desire with a homosexual desire when actually it is not that at all. Lots more I could say.

John Warren

March 07, 2013  4:49pm

Thank you Rosaria for sharing your amazing story. It moved me to tears. I also have a great story. To cut a very long story short, I knew from a young age that I was attracted to guys and not girls. Had my first experience in the army at age 19, came out of the closet at age 21 and then was actively involved in the gay scene for 6 years. At age 27, lonely, unhappy, anti-christianity, I un-successfully tried to end my life. 2 days later I met a christian friend who led a gay church. After giving my life in the gay church Jesus revealed himself to me in amazing ways. I was a strong vocal gay-christian advocate as I was 100% convinced homosexuality was not a sin. Over a period of about 6 months He clearly began to show me that my sexuality was not right. One day face to face with a pastor who stood before me with wide open arms saying we love you but can't entertain the sin, he said I had a choice to make - Did I want to be Gay or did I want to be Straight? .....

Eric Griego

February 23, 2013  3:38pm

Karen, you state "virtually all, if not all secular psychological associations" debunk such attempts as potentially harmful." You see what you want to see. The APA's pamphlet on homosexuality actually says, "All major national mental health organizations have officially expressed concerns about therapies promoted to modify sexual orientation. To date, there has been no scientifically adequate research to show that therapy aimed at changing sexual orientation is safe or effective." That is hardly your statement, “debunk such attempts as potentially harmful." What the APA actually said is … they don't know. The APA's pamphlet also says, "Mental health professional organizations call on their members to respect a person’s right to self determination …" Furthermore, it would be fallacy to believe the APA committee on homosexuality actually speaks on behalf of all shrinks.

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Eric Griego

February 23, 2013  3:37pm

In 1972, when homosexuality was taken out of the list of mental disorders, a sampling of APA membership found that 48% disagreed with the APA’s decision. 5 years later, a larger poll of APA membership showed 69% found homosexuality to be a pathology http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,948045,00.html The removal was a matter of political pressure, not scientific consensus. So, in contrast to your statement “to find a secular therapist to do reparative therapy, that is pretty rare,” would be patently false. It was easy to find shrinks willing to help you change. I do acknowledge that gross intolerance of homosexuals makes it ever more difficult to find shrinks to help you change. For example, homosexual activists recently tried to outlaw helping someone change. They partially succeeded. How evil that the homosexual community is so threatened by potential change they want to outlaw even the possibility. The APA recognizes a right to self determination. Gay activists do not

Eric Griego

February 23, 2013  3:36pm

Yet, I understand why homosexuals want change to be non-existent or rare. It serves their political purpose, and their psychological need. The homosexual community expends tremendous pyschological energy trying t to normalize behavior, trying to force acceptance. If people readily change, those are harder goals to reach. Homosexuals don’t want others to question, as it could lead to them questioning themselves. As a child, I sought out help. I was turned away by a shallow woman believing she was loving me. Saying, ‘It is only society that makes you feel guilt, or makes you feel bad.” She said, “accept yourself this way.” “Seek out homosexual companionship.” She simply refused to help me, and I tried committing suicide as I didn’t want to be that way. Child and after child today wants help to not be that way, yet they are abandoned by a cheap, shallow love just as I was.

Eric Griego

February 23, 2013  3:36pm

You make another assumption that is incorrect. I did not seek a therapist to do “reparative” therapy. I merely sought a shrink whose beliefs about homosexuality were aligned with my desire to not be gay. After that, we made it up as we went along. In retrospect, much of the work I did on myself, and helped others to do, would fall under regression therapy, inner child work, inner healing, symbology. Of the psychoanalytic schools freudian analysis was little help, jungian analysis helped more. Frankly, I have never known what people mean when they say reparative therapy. It appears it is a catch all phrase for homosexual activists to use to describe any attempt to change.

audrey ruth

February 23, 2013  12:59pm

Hollie asked, "Are we simply to assume that conversion to Christianity also means that one is no longer LGBTQ?" My question to Hollie is this: Are we simply to assume that conversion to Christianity -- becoming a new creation in Christ Jesus -- means that He wants those who were adulterers to continue in adultery, those who were alcoholics to continue abusing alcohol, those who were witches and warlocks to continue in witchcraft, etc? He addresses these (and more, including those who were homosexuals) and says, "Such WERE some of you." The Lord is clear in His Word that His grace is not a license to sin. Instead, His grace is power to overcome sin by His indwelling presence. It is a tragedy when His people frustrate His grace by continuing to live as those who are slaves to the spiritual darkness of sin. Why should anyone who has lived in bondage to any form of immorality continue in that bondage? Jesus said, "He whom the Son sets free is free indeed."

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Karen K

February 21, 2013  9:39am

Eric, I hope you realize I am not trying to discount your experience. As I mentioned in my first response to you, I am glad you found the healing you were looking for. I am only puzzled as to why you insist on universalizing your experience. You see Christian therapists as the problem, but virtually all, if not all secular psychiatric and psychological associations debunk such attempts as potentially harmful. Yarhouse and Jones study was controversial when it came out precisely because it suggested that a small percentage *could* experience a change in orientation. So, if you happened to find a secular therapist to do reparative therapy, that is pretty rare. In any case, an analysis of secular studies yields an average low percentage too. So non-Christian studies don't fair better. Plus, reparative therapy is based on secular Freudian frameworks. Incidentally, Yarhouse does not do reparative therapy. He does Sexual Identity Therapy which the APA does approve.

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Eric Griego

February 20, 2013  12:03pm

Karen, you mentioned several shrinks. I took one. It was three year median.You now cite specifically yarhouse. I looked up and read. As I've said, christian shrinks would be woefully equipped to facilitate complete change of homosexuality. It would only make sense that christian shrinks, studying an evangelical christian support group such as exodus would find the results they found. Frankly, I would find it astounding if anyone recovered heterosexual functioning through exodus or any similar modality. The christian shrinks would be exceptionally naive to believe they would. You then say, "We could resort to calling each other liars..." You might see that possibility, that would be your issue. I, on the other hand, have no problem believing that you believe as you do from your results (or lack thereof). Your results would be wholly consistent with what I have said, a christian worldview would be a hinderance to completing change. Your ending lines would be indicative of such.

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