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Among other civil rights milestones, this year marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, the historic rally that concluded with Martin Luther King Jr. unleashing his most legendary words on a watching nation. Today, "I Have a Dream" ...

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audrey ruth

December 08, 2013  5:47am

Paul, the guy who described Obama as "deeply faithful" is terribly deceived. Does the Bible mean nothing to him, as it apparently does to Obama?

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Paul Schryba

October 06, 2013  8:16pm

audrey ruth: Here is another reference to one of President Obama's former spiritual advisors:"For four years he was a spiritual adviser to the leader of the free world. Now, Joshua DuBois, a 30-year-old Pentecostal minister, is moving on from politics and bearing witness to the power of Christian faith inside the White House he served. President Obama is "a deeply faithful president and didn't need a whole bunch of help cultivating that faith," DuBois said in an interview with ABC News recently outside St. John's Episcopal Church, where the Obama family worshipped on Easter. "He begins his morning with a devotional that I send him every day. He worships at churches… as often as he gets a chance to, but he also lives out his faith in the way he serves this country," he said, "prioritizing the poor and vulnerable and making sure to spend time with his own family." [http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/pastor-president-obamas-spiritual-advisor-f aith-white-house/story?id=18856712]

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Paul Schryba

October 06, 2013  8:13pm

audrey ruth: With respect to your statement " Even today, Obama's pastor is big buddies with Louis Farrakhan." That is false. "President Obama has been without a pastor or a home church ever since he cut his ties to the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. in the heat of the presidential campaign. But he has quietly cultivated a handful of evangelical pastors for private prayer sessions on the telephone and for discussions on the role of religion in politics. Will Shilling/Associated Press All are men, two of them white and three black — including the Rev. Otis Moss Jr., a graying lion of the civil rights movement. Two, the entrepreneurial dynamos Bishop T. D. Jakes and the Rev. Kirbyjon H. Caldwell, also served as occasional spiritual advisers to President George W. Bush. Another, the Rev. Jim Wallis, leans left on some issues, like military intervention and poverty programs, but opposes abortion. [http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/15/us/politics/15pastor.html?_r=0]

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Paul Schryba

October 06, 2013  8:11pm

Audrey Ruth: The man you identified as a Muslim is quoted as seeing a cross formed in the sky, and that it was a sign from God in support of the March on Washington. How profound that person's 'theology' is, is not the question- your false identification of him as a Muslim is. "Yes, there is indeed a strong link between the civil rights movement and Black Muslims/Nation of Islam (Cassius Clay/Muhammed Ali is just one example). My friend, the professor of African-American studies, who is a black man, is very aware of this." Again, the only 'strong link' was that they also were for civil rights for African Americans. You fail to give any concrete reference to this 'friend', who apparently isn't willing to stand on record for his views.

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audrey ruth

September 29, 2013  8:20am

Paul, a zillion Catholics have seen all sorts of 'signs' in all sorts of places 'verifying' Mary as worthy of their worship and veneration. So I'm not impressed by such 'signs' as clouds in the sky. To be honest, that reminds me of Charlie Brown and friends who used to study clouds and imagine what they might look like. Yes, there is indeed a strong link between the civil rights movement and Black Muslims/Nation of Islam (Cassius Clay/Muhammed Ali is just one example). My friend, the professor of African-American studies, who is a black man, is very aware of this. Even today, Obama's pastor is big buddies with Louis Farrakhan. Because MLK was a Baptist pastor, the great majority of his followers DID see the civil rights movement as a Christian movement and a LOT of Biblical language was used in speeches, especially MLK's. Most of his followers did not (and still don't) realize that he did not actually believe what the Bible says about Christ Jesus.

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Paul Schryba

September 12, 2013  8:15am

Sorry- but this is good - check this out [http://www.usatoday.com/videos/news/nation/2013/08/14/2654831/] According to his family, Charlie Jackson was given the white hat by the police department, and during the speech he saw moving clouds form a cross in the sky as a sign from God in support of the aims of the march.

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Paul Schryba

September 12, 2013  7:47am

cont. The presence of violence in Dr. King's protests (directly against his wishes) and his 'association' with leaders of the Nation of Islam/Black Panthers was used to discredit him. Dr. King was clearly against the 'black supremacy' of the Nation of Islam, which Malcolm X also did after his pilgrimage to Mecca. The white cap was used by Gandhi; many of Gandhi's followers wore 'white outfits' such as were seen at the mall; their presence would be indicative of Gandhi, not black power and Islam. Your statement that "two professors of history...verified... those men in white robes and hats were indeed Muslims." Name the professors and give references, please. My example, Charlie Jackson, was there because he was appointed by the police department- [http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/martin-luther-king-dream-speech /index.html]

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Paul Schryba

September 12, 2013  7:34am

Audrey Ruth: The nonviolent movement for racial equality was not a 'Christian' movement and not about establishing a 'Christian' nation (though many Christians embraced it, and the movement's nonviolence and vision of 'equality' came from the example of Christ and his teachings; ). That others of different beliefs supported it, as stated previously, does not nullify the movement as a whole. That people seek to 'take advantage' of political leaders and movements is a given. You continually attempt to associate the Black Panthers and Nation of Islam with Dr. King, without directly stating your purpose for that association. They were united in a common goal of ending racial discrimination. The Black Panthers/Nation of Islam did not believe that nonviolence would end discrimination, and Dr. King's insistence on it went against their beliefs. cont.

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audrey ruth

September 11, 2013  1:13am

Paul, you read a lot of things into my comments which were not in my mind at all. I did check with two professors of history (one of African-American studies), and they both verified my concern - those men in white robes and hats were indeed Muslims. A lot of people sought to use MLK for their own purposes, and the Black Power movement arose among the guys in the white outfits (this continues today in Obama's pastor, Jeremiah Wright who unashamedly hates white people and America, is big buddies w/Louis Farrakhan.) Jim Sparks, you also totally misunderstood me: I emphasized the point that I wish ALL people would take MLK's words to heart and truly care ONLY about men's character, not the color of their skin. My point was/is that white preachers are not given the same grace which black preachers are given. There is a much-greater acceptance of immorality in the black community, including black churches. BTW, before you make a common mistake, I am not white. I am neither white nor black.

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audrey ruth

September 11, 2013  12:36am

I also noticed that not one black conservative leader was at the MLK memorial anniversary, yet he said he wanted people to be judged by their character, period. It doesn't look like that day will come anytime soon.

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Bill Both

September 06, 2013  3:41pm

Part of the problem...he disconnect...that the author doesn't address is that "I have a dream" is only the tail end of the famous speech. Earlier, MLK pointed out the inequities in American society that still exist today. He noted that the Declaration of Independence's assertion that "all men are created equal' was a promissory note that had been returned due to insufficient funds. Like a Bible passage, it is a mistake to take one part out of context.

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Jim sparks

August 29, 2013  10:20pm

Some here wish to reject King and his message on the basis of alleged unfaithfulness in his marriage. This would be similar to rejecting Thomas Jefferson's words, "We hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal", on the basis that Jefferson was a slave owner and kept one of his slaves for primarily sexual purposes.

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Paul Schryba

August 29, 2013  9:30pm

audrey ruth: So there were a lot of white hats in the background- so what? Why did you (do you) bring up the issue, asking if they were 'Muslim', without having even tried to research it in the first place? (I found the clear id and explanation I cited earlier in just one google search- so please don't tell me you tried to.) Is it that you wish to further decry MLK as a 'Muslim', or friend of Muslims- cast doubt by innuendo? So what if there were Muslims there, or Hindus for that matter; the movement to end racism, as in the 'I have a dream speech,' was for ALL Americans. As to Malcolm X being a friend of MLK, both were African Americans, both struggling to end racism; but remember, King was strictly against violence- Malcolm X and the Black Muslims weren't. Jesus also was a friend of sinners and tax collectors.

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audrey ruth

August 29, 2013  5:10pm

There's not just one man in a white hat behind MLK in that pic -- there are a lot of them. The prevailing wisdom is that MLK was inspired by Gandhi above all. He did quote some scripture, but, as noted below, He did not believe that Jesus was/is Lord. He had some Muslim friends too, including Malcolm X. The bottom line, though, is that if any white preacher is immoral, he is deemed unworthy, period. He's not given a chance by the public to repent and be restored to the Lord. But people seem to give black preachers a pass on such things. I've noticed this through the years and wonder why this is so. I also noticed that not one black conservative leader was at the MLK memorial yesterday, yet he said he wanted people to be judged by their character, period. It doesn't look like that day will come anytime soon.

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Paul Schryba

August 29, 2013  8:08am

It is clear that the speech isn't just about a 'dream', but a vision for America. Perhaps King chose 'dream', because people then spoke of 'the American Dream.' The speech itself is too focused on racial discrimination; King later recognized the connectedness of racism with war (Vietnam) and economic injustice apart from racism. Still, it deserves its place.--We are all sinners; God uses imperfect vessels. The Bible clearly tells us to remove the mote from our own eye first, and to not cast the first stone. God can choose who He wills, and we should judge the message, not the messenger. Not to excuse King's behavior, but he was jailed, beaten, his family threatened, his house bombed. That he took other than spiritual comfort...St Peter wasn't exactly infallible, either. That King was perhaps not 'orthodox', "Instead, test everything. Hold on to what is good." (1 Thess 5: 21 ISV)

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Paul Schryba

August 29, 2013  8:06am

audrey ruth: [http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/martin-luther-king-dream-speech /index.html] "In reality the hat, like the one worn by non-violent freedom fighter Mahatma Gandhi in India, symbolized peace. The man who wore it, the late Charlie Jackson, was a local hero in Jersey City, a working-class community across the Hudson River from New York." (I didn't look further for the other man.) It was a march for all Americans, and not just Christians. Black Muslims, contrary to King, believed in violence.

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audrey ruth

January 24, 2013  11:37pm

Who are the guys in white hats behind MLK? Are they Muslims/Nation of Islam adherents? I've seen that pic many times, but just noticed them not long ago.

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vic jones

January 23, 2013  9:18am

MLK was not a saint or orthodox Christian, but he was influenced by the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth like Gandhi, William Wilberforce, and many other civil rights reformers of the past, and would be marginalized in today's society for this reason. What passes for civil rights these days is an attempt to normalize morally questionable behaviors, rather than the protection of society's most vulnerable members. MLK believed rights are given to all by God, as opposed to today's movements that advocate force or bribery to take rights from one group and give them to another. Public discourse has become a platform for demonizing and talking past each other, instead of reasoning and listening to opposing views. The current civil rights groups have left those who are most in need of protection - unborn children, human trafficking slaves, the religiously persecuted, and victims of many other injustices in the world.

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S Griffin

January 23, 2013  12:29am

Also as far as his views on the virgin birth and resurrection; I'm gonna ride with Jesus and his word on those points. As great a man as Dr. King was, he doesn't hold my salvation in his hands.

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S Griffin

January 23, 2013  12:24am

I don't think anyone just sees Dr. King as a dreamer, at least I never have.

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