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According to a popular Super Bowl commercial for Dodge Ram trucks, on the eighth day, God made a farmer. The commercial's still, muted photos and steady narration won over many viewers, with Mark Driscoll, Ed Stetzer, and Steve McCoy among the ...

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Displaying 1–12 of 12 comments

audrey ruth

March 20, 2013  12:16am

Phil, how did you miss the rugged black farmer? I loved the commercial because it accurately reflected the values which permeated our society when I was growing up. I also had the great privilege of hearing Paul Harvey on the radio back then (something I took for granted then, but really miss now), so hearing him speak again was wonderful. Reposting Sharon Gorrell's great comment: "As someone who is not a farmer but comes from a family of farmers I do recognize the hardship of the lifestyle and profession and have tremendous respect and admiration for those who are Americas farmers. I have to say I did not see any particular message in the ad except for respect for family, hard work, prayer, community and of course, buy the RAM truck. I like the ad, it was captivating and encouraging to see a company that was willing to bring faith, family and commitment back to prime time. Contrast this with the ad for 2 Broke Girls swinging on a stripper pole.... it puts things in perspective."

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Phil W

February 10, 2013  5:46pm

I like how the ad featured white farmers. I don't want to be reminded about how much of our food production is dependent upon vastly underpaid Hispanic immigrants who can be easily mistreated because of their illegal status. I want to think about strong, rugged white men and how great they are. Thank you RAM!

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Roger Riley

February 09, 2013  8:54am

Thanks for taking a close look at this commercial. This video has been around for a while, nice to see it get center-stage. I agree, this spot is about the values of farming, began back when there was no such thing as urban areas. Now, we can take those values to whatever we do, as we are encouraged to by Colossians 3:23 "Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters," Comparing the Dust Bowl to our current drought comes up short, as there are many differences now. There are so many soil conservation measures in place, seed companies have developed corn which sinks deep roots in search of moisture. Farmers are now mostly doing a responsible job of being a steward of God's resources. Do we trust God with the climate? Or not?

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J Thomas

February 08, 2013  11:16pm

Also, the authors worry over the damage done by farming is misplaced. The numbers of farmers are dwindling fast in America. Young people simply are not going into it anymore. It's too difficult for today's youth. It also hurts that the urban center cultures boorishly deride the rural lifestyle. The author also sneaks in his faith about climate change. I have some news for him...climate change is inevitable. There is no sacrifice to the idol carbon god that you can make that will stop it. The sun is responsible. We're going to have to adjust. Its funny that all of these progressives foist their godless version of evolution upon us, but they incessantly fret about the reality that climate change is natural, that species naturally die out, and that others take their places. They think that they're little gods who can stick their finger in the dike of the cycles of the earth. Ironies from an unrealistic philosophy, really.

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J Thomas

February 08, 2013  11:04pm

The author Meador here misses the point. We loved the commercial because it honored those who are forgotten. It made beauty of weather-worn wrinkles and dirty clothes. It reminded us of family, knuckle-grinding hard work, and those who wake up when the sun comes up and wear themselves out until the sun goes down. Farming is honorable. That's why we love it. It's honest, forthright, simple, and deserves out utmost respect. As someone whose ancestors have included many American farmers for generations all the way back to the 1600's in America, I absolutely loved the commercial. Best superbowl commercial ever. No doubt about it.

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audrey ruth

February 08, 2013  9:36pm

Amen to all comments here! I loved the commercial because it accurately reflected the values which permeated our society when I was growing up. I also had the great privilege of hearing Paul Harvey on the radio back then (something I took for granted then, but really miss now), so hearing him speak again was wonderful. Reposting Sharon Gorrell's great comment: "As someone who is not a farmer but comes from a family of farmers I do recognize the hardship of the lifestyle and profession and have tremendous respect and admiration for those who are Americas farmers. I have to say I did not see any particular message in the ad except for respect for family, hard work, prayer, community and of course, buy the RAM truck. I like the ad, it was captivating and encouraging to see a company that was willing to bring faith, family and commitment back to prime time. Contrast this with the ad for 2 Broke Girls swinging on a stripper pole.... it puts things in perspective."

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Stephen Swihart

February 08, 2013  3:57pm

It seems to me that in the midst of all that is shallow, insignificant and just plain silly (the Super Bowl trappings), we were blessed to hear the clear voice of Paul Harvey remind millions of viewers of what is truly important: faith, family, hardwork.

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Monica Cook

February 08, 2013  2:10pm

Revile or romanticize, we'll just keep on putting out the food because that's the way we roll. We don't really give a hoot what the East--or West--Coasters say about us. What we'd really like is for the multinational corporations to stop shoving their GMO garbage down our throats. A couple days ago my friend told me that Monsanto had demanded the price of her corn because their GMO genes had most likely blown into it and therefore it was their property. Yeah, it's "her" property the same way that a rock thrown through my window is "my" property.

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Brandon Shrock

February 08, 2013  1:02pm

Thank you for the thoughtful article. I have lived in Indiana and been around farming all of my life. We evangelicals forget about the least and unlikely. Do people realize less than 3% of our population are farmers today? The next time you sit down to eat your food, thank God for the farmers who relentlessly worked to provide you convenient food. Thank God for those who also work to take your trash away too. If it were not for God's common grace you would be living in a trash dump and starving. Sorry for the harsh reality. Also, as evangelicals we have given ourselves a bad reputation for not striving to redeem all things. Instead, we sit around as arm-chair Christians and critique everything, like commercials. We should be blazing the trail with innovative farming practices and building Christ-centered rural communities. Not everyone is called to move to the city. Some are called to move to the farm. We need to be people that are obedient to God's call on our lives.

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stephen sokolyk

February 08, 2013  12:01pm

This article is hideous and pointless. What is wrong with celebrating something simple? Does any positive statement have to be accompanied by relentless self-criticism? That's hell, not God's kingdom.

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Sharon Gorrell

February 08, 2013  11:18am

As someone who is not a farmer but comes from a family of farmers I do recognize the hardship of the lifestyle and profession and have tremendous respect and admiration for those who are Americas farmers. I have to say I did not see any particular message in the ad except for respect for family, hard work, prayer, community and of course, buy the RAM truck. I like the ad, it was captivating and encouraging to see a company that was willing to bring faith, family and commitment back to prime time. Contrast this with the ad for 2 Broke Girls swinging on a stripper pole.... it puts things in perspective. I suppose I can understand the concern of Mr. Meador given that it hits close to home for him however I think the larger message was awesome.

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David Buchanan

February 08, 2013  10:53am

this article got off to a good start with discussion about how we need, as a culture, to show respect for the farmers. They are, after all, the people who provide our food as well as many other things that we expect every day. The writer is also correct to point out that over-romanticizing farming is unwise. Farming can be a tough and uncertain life. Unfortunately, the writer goes wrong when he paints issues of environmental degradation with a overly broad brush. This is the tactic of the environmental elite who seem to want agriculture to return to the methods of the 19th century. Sustainable agriculture can be, and is, accomplished using modern methods. Some of those modern methods are illustrated well with the stunning photographs in the advertisement. Forgetting history is unfortunate. So is taking the wrong lessons from history.

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