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David Platt is no stranger to provocative claims. Last spring he challenged the Southern Baptist leadership to rethink its reliance on the "sinner's prayer." Two years earlier he published the bestselling Radical, a trenchant critique of ...

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Dave B.

February 15, 2013  11:29pm

I am a mis_sionary in a restricted country. I read David's "Radical" about a year ago - which was a tremendous inspiration and encouragement to continue sharing Good News. Can hardly wait for his new book "Follw Me". I've appreciated his being "sold out" for the cause of Christ, and taking Biblical stances seriously. I thank God for David Platt!

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Don Modarelli

February 12, 2013  4:33am

I know that I will thoroughly enjoy this book when I buy it on MP3 - but I percieve that I will have problems agreeing with the doctrine of his silence by affirming people in their faith when he has no idea from which theological camp they come from - nor caring as though it is irrelevent. Too many authors hide among the silence of "theological standardisation" assuming that all who love Jesus must have come through the door of sincerity and have no need for further encouragement, like Apollos in Ephesus. "Getting Serious" should include getting serious about the DOOR as well as the PATH! This man is just another Apollos - powerful, zealous, versed in Scripture yet needing to hear the rest of the story (Acts 18).

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Tom Nash

February 11, 2013  11:09pm

I tend to agree with Rick Dalbey that we need a special anointing from the Holy Spirit to bear Spiritual fruit. Otherwise, we fall into a trap of condemnation and bondage, attempting to do good works in an effort to prove to ourselves that we are saved. The truth is we are never going to be good enough to satisfy God. Jesus died that we might be reconciled to God. The important things are reconciliation, fellowship and relationship with the Lord. Yes, being obedient is part of that. Being baptized in the Holy Spirit sounds good too if it promotes a closer walk with Christ. Spiritual fruit will follow as we seek the Lord and the power of the Holy Ghost. Jesus came to set us free. His burden is light and His yoke is easy.

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Rick Dalbey

February 11, 2013  8:17pm

"You assume, because of Platt's denomination, he has no understanding of such a thing; which, lets be honest, is the only reason you replied to this article." What? I have no idea what you mean Garret. I was raised as a conservative baptist. I spent years doing bible studies, trying to be more holy, heard many sermons exhorting more devotion. Then I was baptized in the Holy Spirit as people laid hands on me. Suddenly I could not get enough of bible reading. I witnessed to everyone I saw. I discovered that His yoke is easy and His burden is light. That is why I comment. I fell in love with jesus. Not to correct anyone's theology.

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Garrett S

February 11, 2013  6:36pm

Rick - Platt is neither laying out a discipleship template or expounding upon the nature of the Holy Spirit. This book is about the sovereingty of God and the sufficiency of Christ, in our lives. And while I'm sure you see ministry and pneumatology as inseperable, not everyone emphasizes, "baptism of the Holy Spirit." You assume, because of Platt's denomination, he has no understanding of such a thing; which, lets be honest, is the only reason you replied to this article. If you weren't, we'd actually be engaging what Platt is saying. Ruth - I would read Platt's response on page 5 to the question: "What about, say, a factory worker who loves Jesus and wants to follow him, but works long hours because he needs to support his family? How would you counsel him?" I believe his point is that, following Jesus means being ready and willing to go wherever He asks whether that be in a Factory, or South America; after all, if we're unwilling to go then are we really following Him?

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Rick Dalbey

February 11, 2013  4:48pm

Garret and Don, of course Platt baptises new Christians, he is a Southern Baptist. But the Baptism of the Holy Spirit, or the “Coming upon” or the Pouring out” doesn’t just happen by osmosis. It is meant to be noticable and distinct when it happens. Whether spontaneously as at Pentecost with speaking in tongues and prophesying, or as at Cornelius house where they all spoke in tongues and prophesied. Or as when Ananias laid hands on Paul so the Spirit would come on him or when the apostles were sent to Samaria to lay hands on the new converts and the magician watched and offered to buy the power he saw, or when Paul met the 12 Ephesians and introduced them to Jesus, baptised them in water and then laid hands on them and they all spoke in tongues and prophesied. It is significant, powerful and meant to give the dunamis to witness, evangelize and do miracles as has happened explosively in the last 100 years. This isn’t just theology. It's what's missing in Platt's discipleship template.

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Garrett S

February 11, 2013  3:23pm

Does anyone truly believe that David Platt is rejecting the neccesity of baptism, in this book? That he is somehow ignoring the Holy Spirit's role in carrying the Gospel to the nations? Of course not. David's point of emphasis here is to peel away the layers of people who are decieved into believing their cultural, hand waving Christianity is sufficient in pleasing God by using Biblical, historical, and personal testimony of those who, by the fruit of their lives, we know followed Jesus. Platt isn't "missing" Pentecost or water baptism. He is concerned with the heart of following Jesus, not the theology of missions because, if you are following Jesus, baptism and the Holy Spirit will happen. This isn't to say a book on the theology of missions isn't welcome, it just isn't Platt's aim. It's Platt's focus on the heart of the believer, instead of the theology of the believer, that makes both Radical and Follow Me accessible to the Charismatic and to the Baptist.

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Don Modarelli

February 09, 2013  8:36am

I am really happy to see Mr Platt seriously reconsider the triteness of the Sinner's Prayer, but I wish he would "get serious" and reconsider the scriptural lack of justification for this entrance into covenant relationship with God. In the book of Acts, everyone who heard the Gospel of Jesus responded with water baptism in the name of Jesus Christ - it is the pledge of a good conscience toward God (2 Pet 3:16). We all can benefit from his call to radical response to the call of Christ in our life, not just ticking the "Radical" box, but radical abandon MUST begin with radical obedience to the New Testament plan of salvation Acts 2:38 - otherwise we will be noble and sincere without the Spirit to lead us into all truth.

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Clive Jacobsen

February 08, 2013  8:08pm

While Rick Dalbey is spot-on with his appraisal of "Radical" in pin-pointing the necessity of Acts 2:1-4 & 38 in our born-again experience, nevertheless David Platts' book does come to grips with the obvious necessity of living out our life for Christ as 'sold-out' saints whose life is not their own---but is to be lived out in front of the masses of unsaved people all around every one of us. For that reason I do recommend the book, with a small disclaimer about its obvious lacking.

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Thomas J. Kuna-Jacob,BSFS,MA

February 08, 2013  8:03pm

I'm 65. I grew up in the American Dream. My parents' family were lower middle class til my age of 7, when mom and dad jointly with a renowned local architect built an aesthetically beautiful, Frank Lloyd Wright type of home, built on my father's growing income as a respected physician, but also as a full-time father, husband, Catholic Church lay activist, care for the poor social activist, & gardener (500 rose bushes; 1,000 geraniums). We were immigrants, refugees from Hungarian Communism already in 1945. My father wanted me to be a diplomat; my mother to be an architect. I concurred with my father's plan, out of dread of the Holocaust and nuclear war that soaked the atmosphere of the 1950's and 1960's; graduated from 2 among the most prestigious US Schools of International Studies, but I rejected a diplomatic career and hence, for me, "The American Dream" already in 1971, taught in inner-city schools; returned to Christ in '77; wrote books: www.w-e-r-co.com PeaceWorksPress tabs

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Rick Dalbey

February 08, 2013  5:22pm

David is missing something here. He's asking people to repent, believe, trust in Jesus then go conqueor the world. That is not what Jesus did. He called the disciples to repent, believe in Him, then gave the great commission THEN gave the big, "BUT WAIT till you be clothed with power from on high". Platt is missing Pentecost. Peter told them to “Repent, and each of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.” Paul repented, believed and was baptized and Ananias laid hands on him to be filled with the Spirit. The 12 in Acts 19 belived in Jesus, were baptized in water and then Paul laid hands on them, the Spirit came on them and they spoke in tongues and prophesied. The Samaritans in Acts 8 were repented, were baptized and then they sent the apostles to lay hands on them to recieve the Baptism of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit fell on those gathered at Cornelius house and they spoke in tongues.

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Rob mckee

February 08, 2013  4:33pm

I would love to see David Platt correct the too-largely inaccurate account of Batak conversion that he first shares in Radical and then worsens, if anything, in its sequel. A radical commitment to truth, and to honesty in challenging people with the claims of Jesus on their lives, would seem to require such.

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%%var.bookTitle%%
Follow Me: A Call to Die. A Call to Live.
Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.
2013-02-05
246 pp., $9.03
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