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Pope Benedict XVI, who announced his resignation Monday after eight years as head of the Roman Catholic Church, will leave a legacy of strong theology, cooperation with evangelicals and a hardline conservative stance on social issues, evangelical ...

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Displaying 1–17 of 17 comments

Matt Glover

March 01, 2013  3:26pm

The Roman Catholic gospel is corrupt and sending many people to hell (not withstanding God's electing grace). Once it Reforms we should seek to embrace it. Reckless ecumenical-ism won't achieve that - but loving engagement, speaking the truth in love is what we need to be praying for and doing. This kind of generous view of a mediator other than Christ is blasphemy.

brad Gouwens

February 28, 2013  9:34pm

This is really so true. I discussed it on my blog today. http://therevivalgeneration.wordpress.com/2013/02/28/why-evangelica ls-should-care-about-the-new-pope/

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Lenny ANDERSON

February 18, 2013  12:13pm

Sometimes I as a Protestant think of the Roman Catholic Church as "not Christian." I have heard other Protestants and ex-catholics imply the same thing. In my reading of the last two Pope's work; I have found them to be seeking after and knowing that Jesus Christ "IS" God and part of the Holy Trinity. Yes, the Catholic Church needs to get its house in order, continue to protect the sanctity of marriage, and be unapologetically Pro-Life. They also have to find a way grow the Church in the USA and Europe; but so do all of the Chrsitian Church groups. Maybe they will find a replacement who is strong. It's not Pope Benedict XVI who messed up this world. God is in control and only he can start a revival in this lost, broken world we live in.

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Pilgrim Progress

February 16, 2013  7:26pm

In the catholic branch of our family, three male children were sexually molested by separate priests. Missour, Michigan and California. NONE of these men were arrested after being accused. The church simply very quickly moved them around. The were not made to report where they were transferred. TWO of these vile men, went on to molest little boys in their next assignment. NO, not one of them ever saw justice. They had unlimited funds from their "church" to fight for them, hide them, and lie, lie, lie. Why would any "Christian" support this pope, who had a heavy hand, for the last 30 years, serving two popes as the Child Molester Protector? This article is vulgar and outrageous, and very, very troubling. The author of this article, in all decency, should do a follow up article about the REAL pope Ratslinger. Justice demands it.

Pilgrim Progress

February 16, 2013  7:21pm

It's VERY alarming that none of these comments here seemed to be concerned or troubled with this man's past, and his job performance. He served the last two popes as the Go To Guy for the cover up, hiding, lying, and manufacturing documents to protect the Holy Mother Church and it's thousands and thousands of child molesters. They used their money, influence and considerable powers of obfuscations to PROTECT these evil men. Recent documents show that Ratslinger read EVERY current case file on their victims. Did he discipline even ONE of them? Did he defrock or punish ONE of them? No. He helped hide them, and move them around. He arranged legal funds to defend them. Any "Evengelical" who finds common ground with him is severely misinformed, deluded or a victim of Catholic Propoganda. This pope (I will NOT capitalize that title) resigned because he cannot travel to countries that are punishing their Priest Molesters. He could be arrested as an accessory.

Paul McCain

February 16, 2013  12:34pm

As a confessionally orthodox Lutheran pastor, I've been following Joseph Ratzinger for many years. Unlike any pope previous to him, Ratzinger displayed a genuine interest in, and knowledge of, the theology of Martin Lutheran. In some ways, one could almost say he was the first "Lutheran" Pope. I have always admired his commitment to the historic Christian faith and, of course, his commitment to the life issues, etc.

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Frank Keefe

February 16, 2013  4:39am

Roan its right what you say that Evangelicals are more akin to the Catholic faith than the Anglican faith.Ive watched debates on tv which involved a catholic priest an atheist and an Anglican minister and found the atheist and Anglican agreed more with each other than with the catholic priest.The Church of England is becoming irrelevent to Christians who believe in all of Gods Word because of its contant watering down of that Word.

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Frank Keefe

February 16, 2013  4:31am

The problem Brantley is with your statement to not only follow the written words of the apostles but their oral words NOT if those words clash with Gods written word why do you think the reformation happened.

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Frank Keefe

February 16, 2013  4:24am

As a Protestant I have many issues with the Catholic church but have to say this Pope compared to the Archbishop of Canterbury is like chalk and cheese.The Pope is for the Word of God the Archbishop is for the word of the world the decline in the Anglican faith is stunning because of his drive to make it a 21st century church...it is why I believe gay bishops will soon occupy the pulpits and women also.I have this feeling the new Pope will be a moderniser and then like the Anglican church its decline will be inevitable.

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Marilyn Melzian

February 16, 2013  12:51am

I have been reading Benedict's Jesus of Nazareth books and find them wonderful! (I am not Catholic.) I have just started reading his Introduction to Christianity and it, too, is very good.

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Roan Suda

February 15, 2013  6:16pm

The doctrines that Catholics and Evangelicals share go back to the early Church, and that clearly suggests that they both take seriously the concept of the Church and her authority. Logically, each non-Catholic entity might think of itself as the one true Church, but in practice most do not. The assumption seems to be either that Rome is so seriously wrong that unity is impossible until it sees the light or that unity is a lesser priority. And yet the fact is that conservative Evangelicals have come to see that they have more in common with traditional Catholics than with liberal Protestants. We Catholics do indeed prioritize unity: Ut omnes unum sint.

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Brantly Millegan

February 14, 2013  12:09pm

Hey Glen, I'm Catholic. You are right that Catholics still believe all their "old dogma". The Church doesn't and can't change, because the revelation of God doesn't change. You say Catholics need to trust in Jesus and no one else for salvation: I'm not sure "who else" you think Catholics trust for their salvation. Jesus is the one savior. I'm not sure what you mean by "Sola Ekklesia" - that there is one Church? There's only one Body of Christ. And regarding sola scriptura, 2 Tim 2.15 doesn't teach it, 2 Thess 2.15 clearly states Christians must follow not only the written words of the Apostles, but also their oral preaching (what Catholic call 'Tradition'). Sola scriptura (as a rejection of Traditon as a source of Revelation, and the Church as the interpreter of Revelation) was an invention of the 16th century by Protestants, never held by any Christians prior.

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Glen Waugh

February 14, 2013  9:15am

Has anyone been to the Catholics Come Home webpage. That page only repackages all of the traditions of Roman Catholicism. They still believe in all of the old dogma and that we Protestants need to "come home" to them. I pray for Roman Catholics that they will believe the Gospel (1 Cor. 15:3&4) and that they will trust the Savior (Eph. 1:12&13) AND NO OTHER for salvation. I pray that Roman Catholics will eschew Sola Ekklesia and embrace Sola Scriptura and it in the light of the uniqueness of the Pauline revelation (2 Tim. 2:15).

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Brantly Millegan

February 13, 2013  5:59pm

I notice the part about Vatican I was slightly changed, now it references the "the divine character of the papal office". Not sure how this is much better than what is said before, which was "the divinity of the Pope". The phrase "divine character of the papal office" could only be true in a very broad sense of those terms (e.g. the office was established by God, is protected by God in certain matters, etc). 99% of the people who read it will still think you're saying the Pope is divine in some way, which is obviously false. Also, the sentence that follows still says, "This resignation highlights the leader's humanity". As though people didn't know he was a human? Or is it implying he's only partly human? If that's really what Castaldo said, drop the attribution and say something like this instead: "Vatican I emphasized the special gifts given by God to the petrine office and made it seem distant from average people. This resignation reminds us of the frailty of the office holder."

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Brantly Millegan

February 13, 2013  1:55pm

Paul-Becky Luedtke, You're right that Pope Benedict hasn't changed dogmas seeing as the definition of a dogma is that it can't change. A dogmatic teaching is a teaching that has, with the aid of the Holy Spirit, been infallibility proposed by the Church as revealed by God. It's irreformable. The Pope doesn't have the authority to change dogmas. The Catholic Church can't and won't be taking back the Council of Trent or any other council or dogmatic teachings.

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PAUL-BECKY LUEDTKE

February 13, 2013  1:17pm

He has stalwartly upheld of the great doctrines of the church. Yes, he has held firm on the social issues where evangelicals agree with the Church of Rome. However, he unflinchingly helds to the Council of Trent. He has shown no interest in dialogue with those who believe that the Reformation needed to happen and the Church of Rome still needs to reform its dogmas along Biblical lines. Early in papacy he reaffirmed the Church of Rome's view that it is the only Catholic Church and that salvation is only found in the Church of Rome. It is only through the grace of the Church of Rome that other churches who, all the same, hold to the revealed Gospel, have people saved through that Gospel. So, yes, some evangelicals have loved him, but many are not sorry to see him go.

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Brantly Millegan

February 13, 2013  11:25am

"Vatican I emphasized the divinity of the pope and made the office seem distant from average people. This resignation highlights the leader's humanity, Castaldo said." lol What in the world is this talking about? Vatican I dogmatically defined papal infallibility (only under certain circumstances, and only because of the Holy Spirit, not because of a power intrinsic to whoever happens to be Pope). The Catholic Church doesn't think the Pope is divine at all and never has. lol "Emphasizing the Pope's humanity" - the Pope is always just a sinful human being. This is exactly the type of embarrassing misunderstanding of Catholicism - the largest Christian group on the planet by far, with her teaching easily accessible in a systematic form online (Catechism) - that one finds among evangelicals, even in an otherwise prestigious magazine like CT Today. I recommend this video commentary by Cardinal Arinze: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06UP2qHCxWg

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