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A host at the screening of Grace Unplugged I attended pleaded with the audience to buy out a movie theater auditorium for the film's opening night. We were chastised for going to see The Hunger Games, which, we were told, evangelical Christians ...

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Displaying 1–13 of 13 comments.

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Gaylan Mathiesen

November 01, 2013  5:02pm

I wonder about a film when its promoters have to use guilt to get you to go see it.

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Julia Davis

October 14, 2013  7:32am

I love that this movie is absolutely authentic and true to life. I grew up a pastor's daughter, and my father was viewed as larger than life by all those around me. However, I witnessed his imperfections up close and struggled to respect him and embrace the faith that he represented because of those hypocrisies. This film portrays this so well in the relationship between Grace and her dad--it really resonated with me. It is also such an accurate portrayal of every church musician's struggle. We want to strive for excellence because we want what we do to honor the Lord--and we also want our songs to be emotional to help our church more fully experience Christ in worship. Yet it can quickly turn into a drive for perfectionism and an outlet for self expression for the impure motive of self-glorification. Watching Grace wrestle through HOW she would use her God-given musical talents is exactly the road I've walked for 10 years. An excellent, authentic, soul-searching film!

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Julia Davis

October 14, 2013  7:19am

What a snarky, cynical review! It sounds like you made up your mind before you even walked in to the theater that you were going to hate it. When Christians share our testimony, one of the standard protocols is to give enough information about your pre-Christ past for others to understand how God has changed your life--but don't focus so much on the details of it that it becomes a greater emphasis than redemptive power of grace. Yet you rip this movie apart because it does just that. It is not edifying or necessary for me as a believer to sit through scene after scene of moral depravity in order to appreciate when a prodigal comes home. It sounds like you have grown numb to these types of scenes and feel they are necessary in a film though--a very worldly viewpoint. Grace doesn't have to fall long, hard, and deep in order far to experience grace. I love that this film shows an authentic conversion of a typical Christian teen coming of age and owning her faith.

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Frank Keefe

October 12, 2013  9:58am

Christians have to ALWAYS take into account especially in the US ( Im a Brit ) those who call themselves liberal Christians will more than likely attack a Christian film if it doesn't have a bit of worldly sex or violence in it to make it gel with non Christians this is a snare put down by the enemy Satan.I agree Christian films must look professional with reasonable good acting (im not talking about Brando or Sharon Stone here ) otherwise critics will have a field day Im talking Christian critics. To be honest with you the last time I saw a faith based film was The Cross And The Switchblade which I thought was reasonably good.Keep the faith.

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audrey ruth

October 10, 2013  12:26pm

Sarah Smith said, "The problem with much of Christian media is that when you don't show any evil you are left with nothing worth fighting against or anything to be redeemed from." I remember seeing The Restless Ones, a film aimed at teens and produced by the BGEA, many years ago. That film was actually way ahead of its time in showing evil just as it is and how destructive it was in young people's lives (and still is today.) I haven't seen Grace Unplugged (yet), but I hope to see it soon. I can't comment on it until then. :)

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ERNIE LEE MARTIN

October 10, 2013  2:20am

Well, I actually saw the movie Grace Unplugged. It was just right, nearly perfect. The story, the scripting, the acting, the sound track and the cinematography. To say that there wasn't enough evil in act two to allow a full redemption in act three is not accurate. She fell from "grace", not as low as what many do, but low enough to be realistic to average Christian families. What do you want... a female slasher? It is a movie for anyone, yes even those who are not Christians. It is best suited for Christians, at least the millions who say they are Christians. It has raised the bar of Christian Films for others to follow. I believe that every (unless they live in paradise) Christian teen should see it before they live it. The movie isn't advocating hiding your light under a bushel at all, it allows that she needs to use her talent while following her faith at the same time. In it's class it deserves...5 stars! ***** More....more....more!

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Tyrone Barnes

October 07, 2013  10:40am

I already saw "Spring Breakers", a vastly superior film with far more depth and insight into the "prodigal child" mold of storytelling. I have had my fill, thank you.

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R Weaver

October 07, 2013  9:07am

Having sat through youth group showings of the rapture series (Thief in the Night, A Distant Thunder, et al) in my younger days, I approach "Christian" movies with trepidation. I believe Mr. Morefield is correct in his diagnosis of the acting in so many faith-based films. I cringe with every wooden line delivery and syrupy moral delivered in ham-handed fashion. That is why I have been pleasantly surprised by the recent spate of faith-based films. The quality of both the acting and plots has far exceeded my expectations. Soul Surfer is a great example and I place Grace Unplugged in the same category. As Believers, we have to face the fact that the salvation story is rather simple. It is the "getting there" that makes the story insightful and interesting. Our movies will always end with a positive message because that is what we have to share. We saw Grace Unplugged yesterday and everyone was thoroughly entertained and impressed with both the acting and the story. I highly recommend it!

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Sarah Smith

October 06, 2013  9:32pm

I think that the reviewer hit the nail on the head. The problem with much of Christian media is that when you don't show any evil you are left with nothing worth fighting against or anything to be redeemed from.

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Seth Little

October 05, 2013  1:03pm

Here is yet another insightful review from Mr. Morefield. My own upbringing led me to prefer this type of film and Contemporary Christian Music and the like: content created by the Church for the Church. In recent years I've come to love the Church more than ever and to deeply desire its flourishing. But I've also come to believe that the flourishing of the Church is directly related to the flourishing of the whole world. In other words, Christian content made for Christians is good, but it can't exist over against Christian content for the world or plain old [good] content for whomever. Andy Crouch's excellent book Culture Making helped me tremendously here. Thanks again for a thoughtful review.

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Dave Peterson

October 04, 2013  12:52pm

"I can tell you that the audience I saw the film with adored it." - proof once again that if a critic doesn't like it, most people will. I will be going to see the movie - and a bit more excited about it now than before I read the review.

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John Percy

October 04, 2013  11:22am

You know why Christian movies are terrible, with few exceptions? Because the actors are terrible, the writing is terrible, and the director is terrible. You seldom think the actors or the story is believable. You always come away thinking that the movie is a sermon in disguise, that that is what its original purpose was - not to tell a good story, but to teach a moral, to preach at the audience. Until christian movie makers decide to make a good movie whose main goal is to tell a good story for the sake of telling the story, not the sake of saving the viewers souls, they won't make a good movie.

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Gregg Farah

October 04, 2013  9:37am

Thanks for a refreshingly honest review. Too often it feels like reviewers sacrifice honesty to support ministry efforts. I do want to support ministry efforts, but I also want the creative bar held high. Thanks for calling 'em like you see 'em.

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Displaying 1–13 of 13 comments.

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