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In the south transept of London's Westminster Abbey—where for a thousand years the kings and queens of England have been enthroned—sits a crowded collection of statues, plaques, and engraved flagstones. Geoffrey Chaucer, Alfred Lord ...

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REV DR JOHN WADE LONG JR

January 10, 2014  9:30pm

Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee's reaction to the screening of The Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe in London is ample testimony to the fact that Lewis' apologetic intentions in the Chronicles series were heard loud and clear - at least by adults, believing or not. She wrote: "Narnia represents everything that is most hateful about religion.... Of all the elements of Christianity, the most repugnant is the notion of the Christ who took our sins upon himself and sacrificed his body in agony to save our souls. Did we ask him to? Poor child Edmund, to blame for everything, must bear the full weight of a guilt only Christians know how to inflict, with a twisted knife to the heart. Every one of those thorns, the nuns used to tell my mother, is hammered into Jesus's holy head every day that you don't eat your greens or say your prayers when you are told...." www://theguardian.com/books/2005/dec/05/cslewis.booksforchildrenandteenager s

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Pop Seal

November 18, 2013  8:06am

Lewis is more needed than ever throughout Christian circles. Popular society's 'user friendly' shallowness afflict many a church. Worship is fast being reduced to singing camp fire songs that teach nothing at the expense of grand hymns. "Artificial emotional stimulation", to quote Maj. Ian Thomas, leads the Great Evangelical Disaster, described in Francis Schaffer's book of that name. That was in the 1980s and hardly a thing has changed for the better since those days.

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Jim Ricker

October 26, 2013  4:54pm

Lewis' genius is not Narnia (although Narnia is part of his genius) but rather his ability to span genres and speak to almost any group of people. From 'Surprised' to 'Bondage' to his criticism of Milton and to fantasy, he wrote well in all and as is the Brit's way, they made him wait for his recognition.

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