Guest / Limited Access /

Critics of ex-Muslim academic Ergun Caner say his attempt to remove online videos of his talks is designed to quell criticism. Caner's attorney says it's a case of simply defending copyright.

The case is slowly working its way through federal ...

Read More

Displaying 1–4 of 4 comments.

1    Show All

Steve Wilkinson

December 06, 2013  5:09pm

"'The cyber-attack crowd aims to hurt and destroy Christian leaders,' he said." Certainly, there is such a crowd that exists, though I'm not sure what this has to do with the Caner situation. Information put out in the public can also be used to hold people accountable for what they say and claim. Christian leaders can also use this in their apologetics with regard to other religions or secular society as well. The danger comes when such information is chopped up and used out of context to falsely portray some situation (often associated with the so-called 'cyber-attack' crowd). However, this is not the situation in this case with Caner. The evidence is extremely clear. He's wrong... he's hiding behind the protection of the 'good-ol-boys network' trying to protect one of their own at the cost of the reputation of Christian apologetics and witness.

Report Abuse

Steve Wilkinson

December 06, 2013  4:58pm

This article is laughable if you know the back-story. What isn't so funny is the negative impact on Muslim-Christian relations & apologetics. It is a very serious matter which the majority of Christians are failing to take seriously (& the majority taking it seriously are involved in the cover-up). - "designed to quell criticism" Well, yes in part, though many powers-that-be in Evangelicalism are doing a pretty effective job of that already. We're talking well know apologists, church leaders, and major seminaries. - "simply defending copyright" If this were true, Caner could effectively answer the challenges of the critics. - "videos show Caner in 2005 warning U.S. Marines..." Well, that and claiming to have a whole history (which he made up) that might actually qualify him to give such warnings. - "He believed Caner had tried to deceive people..." No, not believed... the video is evidence which proves it... and not tried... DID! Google "The Great Evangelical Cover up"

Report Abuse

J B

December 05, 2013  12:06pm

Actually the attorney for one of the defendants is arguing that the case should be dismissed because Caner did not list the US government as a defendant, as the US Marines were responsible for distributing the allegedly copyrighted material to the public after the FOIA request.

Report Abuse

Kelvin Smith

December 03, 2013  4:35pm

A potential problem with his copyright claim is that apparently the videos (or at least some of them) come from speaking in U.S. government settings. If he was paid to speak to the Marines, it would probably be considered "work for hire," making the U.S. government the owner, and all U.S. government-produced work is automatically public domain. I'm surprised none of the lawyers quoted in the story brought that up (or, if it got edited out, CT missed a significant issue).

Report Abuse

Displaying 1–4 of 4 comments.

1    Show All