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Asking questions about Heaven may seem like asking questions about Katmandu, Kuala Lumpur, or some other exotic place you are unlikely to see firsthand—an occasion for speculation. But writing about Heaven is not really like writing about faraway places ...

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Carlos Ramirez Trevino

November 03, 2013  6:02pm

Interesting article, but the answers to the 35 questions raise more complex questions. How, for example, does the statement Jesus make that there will be no remembrance of the past in heaven apply to the perfectly balanced state-of-being of the Kingdom of God? Besides, what about regrets, perhaps one of the most significant problems we have? If heaven is a state of total incorruptibility and perfection, will there be such a thing as regret? Will there be marriage in the new Kingdom? Well, Jesus seems to indicate that there won't. How does that affect the sense of family? I am inclined to believe that the Kingdom of Heaven is a condition, not a place. It is a state of being where the shadow we now see of the Law is inscribed in the heart. Much like in the commercial for Outback, there will be no rules in heaven. Rules are to keep us on track. In that heavenly state-of-being there will be no deviation. Paul makes that very clear. What we will have after the resurrection is an enlightened understanding. When we understand why the suffering, when everything is in perspective, when we understand as we are understood and see as clearly as we are seen, the memories of the past will not be painful. Then there will be no regrets. Peter Kreeft based his responses on the common belief that God’s original intent was to create an eternal humanity. But humanity was never meant to last forever. We were created so that Christ could have a mortal body through which to eradicate all manner of wickedness and establish eternal perfection, righteousness. Flesh and blood was mortal and temporary from the beginning. Pain and suffering are the result of corruption and will never exist again. And that is the good news of the victory of Christ over death. God’s Kingdom is not a place for humanity to become what it was supposed to be. The new heaven, the new earth, and the new Jerusalem are simply an eternal existence in the presence of God and his creations dipped in complete perfection and righteousness. Of course, that’s my take. (Heb 10:5, Dan 9:24, Isa 25:7-8, Acts 2:23, 2 Tim 1:9, Rom 8:20-21, 2 Pet 3:10, Rev 21, Heb 2:14, 1 Cor 15:50).

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